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EarthObserver (for iPad) Review - PCMag.com

Featured News - 15 min 23 sec ago
The EarthObserver educational iPad app developed at Lamont-Doherty provides hundreds of world maps showing intriguing information in a huge variety of disciplines.

Demob!

The ENAM Seismic Experiment - Wed, 10/22/2014 - 11:11

After five days in North Carolina we have recovered all of the 80 stations. The stations have been recording for one month along two profiles. Now we are downloading the data at the instrument center at the East Carolina University in Greenville.  The last step is getting the equipment ready for shipping back to PASSCAL in New Mexico.

Beatrice (Bix), Dan and Ana working onsite at the first station recovered. Bix and Ana are checking the parameters of the Reftek with the CLIE, and Dan is saving the GPS waypoint of the recovery site.


Yanjun working on one of the stations recovered on the north line. He is performing a check with the CLIE to see the number of events recorded, the data stored on the disks and stopping the acquisition. He also checks all 3 channels on the L28 sensor. Once the acquisition has been stopped, the sensor can be pulled and the station is taken back to the instrument center.


A few of the Refteks at the instrument center. The upward cap indicates that the data have been downloaded.


Yanjun labeling Reftek flash cards that contain recordings from the past month.


Flash cards labeled with Reftek serial numbers. This is the product of our hard labor!

Being a scientist rocks!

The ENAM Seismic Experiment - Wed, 10/22/2014 - 10:57

We experienced wonderful weather during the past week working in North Carolina. The scenic countryside is filled with tobacco fields, cotton fields, and other crops. One lucky recovery team started the first day on Kitty Hawk Beach demobilizing site 101.

Beach near the easternmost station on the north line of the onshore profiles



One of the many cotton fields in the eastern North Carolina coastal plain

'Storm Surge’ by Adam Sobel on Hurricane Sandy - Washington Post

Featured News - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 11:00
The Washington Post reviews Lamont-Doherty scientist Adam Sobel's new book on Hurricane Sandy.

Sun-gazing

Geopoetry - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 10:00
 De Pontieu et al., Science 2014

Dopplergrams from the NASA’s space telescope IRIS (Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph) revealing detailed evidence of “twist” between the sun’s surface and outer atmosphere. These phenomena may play a role in driving the temperature difference between the sun’s surface (~6000 K) and the sun’s outer atmosphere (millions of degrees). The reason for this enormous temperature gradient is not fully understood (a puzzle known as the “coronal heating problem”). Image: De Pontieu et al., Science 2014

 

By Galileo’s careful hand, sunspot details are exquisite,

Through eye of forehead, eye of mind beholds what body can not visit.

If only he could see the sights now rendered from Earth’s outer space,

Ultraviolet sunscapes – Oh, to see his raptured face!

High above Earth’s atmosphere, IRIS probes the edges of our star,

A telescope in orbit, through its lenses, we see far.

Six thousand Kelvin screams the surface, roiling plasma, like hellish seas,

Hotter still, the sun’s corona: millions of degrees!

Mysterious, this source of heat that drives the solar wind our way …

High-speed jets, coronal loops and nanoflares may be at play.

What a thrill to gaze through space with spectrographic eyes,

Fueled by human wonder and a zeal to probe the skies.

 

__________________________________________________________

Further reading:

Eyeing the Sun, Science Magazine

This is one in a series of poems written by Katherine Allen, a researcher in geochemistry and paleoclimate at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences at Rutgers University.

Columbia's Burden Room Through Time - Columbia Record

Featured News - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 09:21
Profile of Columbia's Burden Room in Low Library, one of the stops on Lamont scientist Dave Walker's geology tour of campus.

Langseth limericks

The ENAM Seismic Experiment - Fri, 10/17/2014 - 01:19
As we approach the end of the cruise, I think this calls for a round of salty Langseth limericks.  It helps if you imagine a round of hearty “Aye, matey!”  and “Arr!” and such between each verse.

There once was the Langseth, a ship

Over wave and trough did she skip.

Many instruments aboard

To always record

Depth, gravity, mag – every blip.

There once was the Langseth, a vessel

Where in their bunks scientists nestled.

‘Til called to their shifts

Their heads they must lift

For with errors and logs they must wrestle.

There once was the Langseth, a boat

On her airguns the crew they would dote.

Oft while in a turn

Guns were brought up astern

To ensure best acoustical note.

There once was the Langseth, seacraft.

Where we launched XBTs down a shaft.

With each probe descent

To the lab data went

So that temperature-depth could be graphed.

There once was the Langseth, a fine tub!

Where the galley crew made us good grub.

But when seas ran high

Up in knots stomachs tied

And to keep the food down, there’s the rub.

There once was the Langseth, fair barge.

To collect seismic data her charge.

Streamer 8-km long

And four gun strings strong

She’s the fleet’s seismic dreadnaught at large!

-Tanya Blacic, aboard the R/V Marcus. G. Langseth

US Dust Bowl Unrivalled in Past 1,000 years - Scientific American

Featured News - Thu, 10/16/2014 - 11:00
Atmospheric conditions and human actions combined to drive the 1930s mega-drought, according to a new study led by Lamont's Benjamin Cook.

Another Dust Bowl? California Drought Resembles Worst in Millennium - LiveScience

Featured News - Wed, 10/15/2014 - 14:36
The 1934 drought is the worst on record for North America in the past 1,000 years, and had similar conditions to the current California drought, says a new study led by Lamont's Benjamin Cook.

Locked Faults Could Pop Big Earthquake in Bay Area - NBC News

Featured News - Tue, 10/14/2014 - 08:14
Lamont-Doherty seismologist and deputy director Arthur Lerner-Lam comments on a study putting the chance of a big earthquake in the San Francisco Bay Area in the next 30 years at 70 percent.

Extreme High Tides Could Flood Our City's Streets - WNYC

Featured News - Mon, 10/13/2014 - 14:37
Lamont's Klaus Jacob explains what should be done to protect New York City from rising seas.

Lamont-Doherty Open House Highlights - (Rockland/Westchester) Journal News

Featured News - Sun, 10/12/2014 - 11:00
Video of an erupting "trash can" volcano and other highlights from Lamont-Doherty's 2014 Open House.

Last Day of the Cruise!

The ENAM Seismic Experiment - Fri, 10/10/2014 - 10:58

October 10th, 20141158
Three days ago, at approximately 2130, we recovered our final OBS and started our 36-hour transit back to Narragansett, RI. We began docking procedures at Senesco Marine LLC at around 1300 yesterday and were all tied up by 1400. After the lines were clear, both watches performed some preliminary breakdown of the OBS equipment to help stage it for demobilization this morning. It was impressive how fluidly we took and executed directions after a month of working together. It was clear that the trip had bonded us as a team. After everything was done, the group headed out to enjoy our first night on land, which, as anyone whose been on a ship for an extended period will tell you, is just an incredible feeling. One of the eeriest moments, however, was all of a sudden being surrounded by people besides those you’ve been on the trip with. Also, the “dock rock” is an interesting experience.
This morning, after a wonderful, final breakfast made by our steward, Mike Duffy, we packed up the final gear and the crew began lifting it off the boat, staging it on the pier. All that’s left now is to clean up my stateroom, pack up all my stuff, and head on home. This cruise has been both a great scientific and personal learning experience and I am happy to have worked with these crewmembers, techs, researchers, and students. The lab seems so empty now, as I write this post, and there’s a part of me that is sad that this adventure is ending regardless of how excited I am to get back to life on land.
Anyways, time for me to go. For those who are interested in the data we’ve collected on this cruise, look out for information concerning workshops on data access and processing in the near future.
Signing off,Dylan Meyer aboard the R/V Endeavor
Figure 1. Evening recovery of the last OBS, there was much rejoicing!
Figure 2. A crewmember, Charlie Bean, tossing a leading line with a monkey fist to the dock.
Figure 3. The WHOI OBS van and SIO OBSs staged on the pier to be loaded onto trucks.
Figure 4. The WHOI OBS van being loaded onto a truck for transit back to Woods Hole.
Figure 5. The, now empty, lab deck of the R/V Endeavor.

Chemical silence

Geopoetry - Fri, 10/10/2014 - 08:26

 Elkhorn coral colony near Akumal, Mexico. John Bruno (Science).

Photo: Elkhorn coral colony near Akumal, Mexico. John Bruno (Science).

 

What if you couldn’t smell smoke?

Or detect flirty signs from a bloke?

Imagine the cost

Of faculties lost,

Of signals that deafness would cloak …

On reefs, it’s chemical cues

That life-forms will commonly use;

With acid on rise,

A fatal surprise:

What senses might reef-critters lose?

 

__________________________________________________________

Further reading:

Ocean acidification foils chemical signals, Science

 

This is one in a series of poems written by Katherine Allen, a researcher in geochemistry and paleoclimate at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences at Rutgers University.

 

Climate Change Disrupts Arabian Sea with Voracious Plankton - Climate Wire

Featured News - Thu, 10/09/2014 - 14:37
Features plankton study by Lamont's Helga Goes and Joaquim Gomes.

Photographers, Scientists Share Climate Change Pictures - Wall Street Journal

Featured News - Wed, 10/08/2014 - 11:00
Scientists and photographers will post pictures related to climate change in a partnership with the International Center of Photography. Lamont climate scientist Billy D'Andrea featured in one photo.

Is Capturing Carbon from the Air Practical? - MIT Technology Review

Featured News - Wed, 10/08/2014 - 09:23
Profile of former Lamont-Doherty director Peter Eisenberger and his plan to save the world with technology that takes carbon out of the air.

Scripps OBS GoPro

The ENAM Seismic Experiment - Sat, 10/04/2014 - 04:16
I had this idea to attach our GoPro cameras to a Scripps OBS that was being deployed on the shelf nearer the coast.  These underwater housings are rated to 100 feet and we deployed them on three different sites at that depth, recording some of the coolest OBS video I have ever seen.  The stills captured from the video are pretty cool too, but one of the unexpectedly groovy features of the video is the audio.  You can hear the acoustic responses, ship noise in the shallow, ocean background biology, and current noise on the seafloor.


Time series of deployment and recovery. Photo Credit: Ernie Aaron.~ErnieR/V Endeavor

Riding big swells and crossing the Gulf Stream

The ENAM Seismic Experiment - Fri, 10/03/2014 - 14:01

On calm days, you could almost forget that you are in the middle of the ocean.  Its sunny and calm outside, and everything is stable inside.  People get lax and leave cups and other items on table tops unsecured and unattended.  And then some big swells come, and we all remember why chairs are tied to tables, furniture is nailed down to the deck and we use bungie cords and sticky pads to keep computers and other gear in place. Today we are experiencing swells up to 5 m high, in which the ship has rolled up to 25 degrees.  Unsecured items (including people in chairs!) are rolling all over the lab. Meanwhile, we are also crossing the Gulf Steam, which poses it own challenges to our gear. Fishermen are particularly concentrated here, and today we deviated 10 km off of our profile to avoid fishermen and their gear.  The currents are also pushing our seismic streamer around.  In the ideal case, the streamer extends straight behind the vessel and quietly rides 9 meters below the water surface.  The currents today have pushed it to the side by 70 degrees from the ideal track, and the swells generate noise on the hydrophones.  However, even though conditions may not be ideal, it is essential that we collect data here for our science goals. We think that there are thick accumulations of frozen magmas beneath the Earth’s surface here that formed when the supercontinent of Pangea broke apart to form the Atlantic Ocean.  So we shall push ahead!Annotated screen capture from our navigation system showing the ship, the streamer, our intended profile and our deviation.
 Donna Shillington from the R/V Langseth
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