News aggregator

The Most Astonishing Thing

Geopoetry - Fri, 02/27/2015 - 09:00
A super-massive black hole, roughly 12 billion times as massive as our sun, has been discovered at the center of a bright quasar. The light reaching us now from that distant location has been traveling for billions of years, and thus offers a glimpse into the earliest stages of the universe.

A super-massive black hole, roughly 12 billion times as massive as our sun, has been discovered at the center of a bright quasar. The light reaching us now from that distant location has been traveling for billions of years, and thus offers a glimpse into the earliest stages of the universe. Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech

 

The most astonishing thing about the universe, in my eyes,

Is not merely its gargantuan, unfathomable size,

But the way its vastness ferries gorgeous, primordial light,

So that as we look up into the night,

The farther afield our gaze penetrates, the higher we climb,

The farther we can see back in time.

Like ancient missives carefully tucked into a bottle,

Flashes of history race towards us full-throttle,

At the speed of light traversing a fabric expanding,

These waves touch our shores, and fuel our understanding

Of quasars and black holes, the light and the dark,

The Very Beginning, the bright cosmic spark

From which all this sprang – upon us, the story rains:

Of how we arose with star stuff in our veins.

 

_________________________________________________________

Further reading:

Gigantic Black Hole Discovered from the Dawn of Time, National Geographic

An ultraluminous quasar with a twelve-billion-solar-mass black hole at redshift 6.30, Wu et al. (2015) Nature

This is one in a series of poems written by Katherine Allen, a researcher in geochemistry and paleoclimate at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences at Rutgers University.

Unexpected role of climate in bringing plague to medieval Europe - CBS News

Featured News - Mon, 02/23/2015 - 12:00
Quotes Lamont scientist Brendan Buckley.

A Thirsty, Violent World - The New Yorker

Featured News - Mon, 02/23/2015 - 12:00
Growing hunger and the struggle to find clean water for billions of people are clearly connected. Quotes Lamont scientist Jason Smerdon.

Did Dark Matter Kill the Dinosaurs? - Science

Featured News - Sat, 02/21/2015 - 12:00
Quotes Dennis Kent, a geophysicist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.

Eco-Drones Aid Researchers in Fight to Save the Environment - NBC News

Featured News - Fri, 02/20/2015 - 12:00
At Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, Chris Zappa is planning his next mission to monitor ice melt in the Arctic..

Mysterious Demise of an Australian Thunder Bird

Geopoetry - Fri, 02/20/2015 - 08:00
 Ann Musser @ Australian Museum.

Genyornis newtoni, one of the great “thunder birds” of Australia, went extinct about 50 thousand years ago, for reasons that are still not clear. Image: Ann Musser @ Australian Museum.

 

Here, mankind and death coincide,

But everyone’s still mystified …

Geologists find

This thunder bird’s kind

Were lost as Australia dried.

 

_________________________________________________________

Further reading:

Hydrological transformation coincided with megafaunal extinction in central Australia, Cohen et al. (2015) Geology

Drying lakes linked to extinctions, Nature

 

This is one in a series of poems written by Katherine Allen, a researcher in geochemistry and paleoclimate at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences at Rutgers University.

Global WARming - BusinessWorld Online Edition

Featured News - Mon, 02/16/2015 - 10:17
Quotes Mark Cane.

U.S. Droughts Will Be the Worst in 1,000 Years - Scientific American

Featured News - Thu, 02/12/2015 - 12:00
The Southwest and central Great Plains will dry out even more than previously thought.

A ‘megadrought’ will grip U.S. in the coming decades, NASA researchers say - Washington Post

Featured News - Thu, 02/12/2015 - 12:00
The Southwest and central Plains will experience a dry weather shift 35 years from now, a NASA, Cornell and Columbia study said.

Is climate change fuelling war? - The Japan Times

Featured News - Wed, 02/11/2015 - 10:49
Quotes Mark Cane.

Turning Carbon Dioxide Into Rock, and Burying It - New York Times

Featured News - Tue, 02/10/2015 - 11:52
Article on Lamont-Doherty collaboration features adjunct scientist Juerg Matter.

Carbon Reduction and History and President Johnson - The Energy Collective

Featured News - Tue, 02/10/2015 - 11:51
The only surviving member of the sub-panel, Wallace Broecker, geology professor at Columbia University's Earth Institute, said by telephone he does...

Seafloor Eruptions Triggered by Tides, Ice Ages - National Geographic News

Featured News - Sat, 02/07/2015 - 12:00
Even small changes in sea levels-which affect the weight sitting on top of volcanoes-are enough to influence underwater eruptions, says a new study.

Secrets in the Ice - Nautilus

Featured News - Thu, 02/05/2015 - 14:13
Quotes glaciologist Tim Creyts of LDEO on the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains.

Investigate Fortitude: Plague Under the Ice - Pivot

Featured News - Thu, 02/05/2015 - 12:00
Video with Lamont scientist Bob Newton comments on science behind the TV drama.

De Blasio Plans Affordable Housing in Areas Swamped by Hurricane Sandy - InsideClimate News

Featured News - Wed, 02/04/2015 - 12:00
Klaus Jacob, a geophysicist at Columbia University who studies climate change's impact on infrastructure, said the move is risky and short-sighted.

Recurring Meteor Shower On Mercury? NASA’s MESSENGER Suggests So - Planetsave

Featured News - Tue, 02/03/2015 - 12:00
Quotes Lamont director Sean Solomon.

Arsenic Present in Private Wells Threatens People in Many U.S. States - Medical News

Featured News - Mon, 02/02/2015 - 12:00
Article on study led by Lamont adjunct Yan Zheng.

Earthquakes Rattling Glaciers, Boosting Sea Level Rise - GlacierHub

Featured News - Sat, 01/31/2015 - 12:00
Quotes research conducted by Dr. Meredith Nettles.
Syndicate content