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Updated: 14 min 38 sec ago

Our Planet's Magnetic Poles Aren't Reversing Any Time Soon - Gizmodo

Tue, 11/24/2015 - 12:00
Over the past couple of hundred years, the strength of the Earth’s geomagnetic field has been waning, leading scientists to wonder if our planet’s polarity is on the verge of flipping. New research by Lamont-Doherty's Dennis Kent puts the dip into perspective.

Don’t Flip Out: Earth’s Magnetic Poles Aren’t About to Switch - Science

Mon, 11/23/2015 - 12:00
Earth is not heading toward a reversal of its magnetic field any time soon, new research from Lamont-Doherty's Dennis Kent assures. While weakening, Earth’s magnetic field is still quite strong by historical standards.

Christopher H. Scholz Wins Top Honor in Seismology - Seismological Society of America

Mon, 11/23/2015 - 12:00
The Seismological Society of America will present its highest honor, the Harry Fielding Reid Medal, to Lamont-Doherty's Christopher H. Scholz this spring.

Turning CO2 Into Rock: Podcast with Peter Kelemen - How Do We Fix It?

Thu, 11/19/2015 - 14:15
The demand for energy around the world continues to grow each year. And so does the amount of carbon dioxide that's pumped into the earth's atmosphere. Lamont's Peter Kelemen explains in this podcast.

New Center for Climate & Life to Bring Latest Science to Business & Finance - Columbia Record

Thu, 11/19/2015 - 14:11
The Center for Climate and Life, a new research initiative based at Columbia’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, will focus on how climate change affects our access to such basic resources as food, water, shelter and energy.

Dwindling Snowpack Around the World Threatens Water Supply for 2 Billion People - Vice News

Thu, 11/19/2015 - 12:00
As global warming brings about a decline in snowpacks around the world, billions of people face a high risk of shrinking water supplies in the coming century, a study by Lamont-Doherty's Justin Mankin finds.

For Severe Weather, 'Is This Climate Change?' Is the Wrong Question - Live Science

Thu, 11/19/2015 - 12:00
The links between climate change and severe weather are not as simple as blaming a severe storm on a warming planet, as Lamont-Doherty's Jason Smerdon explains.

El Niño and Its Connections to Extreme Weather - TRNS Radio

Tue, 11/17/2015 - 18:19
El Niño is driving drought in Indonesia, heavy rain in Argentina and intense Pacific cyclones. Lamont-Doherty's Adam Sobel, director of the Columbia Initiative on Extreme Weather and Climate, describes the connections between El Niño and extreme weather during the El Niño 2015 Conference.

Billions of People Depend on Water From Shrinking Snowpacks - New York Times

Tue, 11/17/2015 - 12:00
Snowpacks are a vital source of water for humans, but they may shrink in some regions as the climate warms. A new study from Lamont-Doherty's Justin Mankin estimates how changes in showfall will affect water supplies.

Carlos Gutierrez: A Life at Sea Aboard Research Ships - Columbia Record

Mon, 11/16/2015 - 12:00
Carlos Gutierrez operates heavy equipment on the R/V Marcus G. Langseth. In his 43 years here, he has worked on every Lamont-run ship since the Vema, a three-masted schooner.

Climate Change May Lead to Water Crisis - Tech Times

Mon, 11/16/2015 - 09:55
More than two billion people living in the Earth's northern hemisphere may face an impending water crisis as the snow deposits that help provide them with much needed water supply are beginning to decline as a result of climate change. A new study led by Lamont's Justin Mankin looks at the populations most at risk.

Shrinking Snowpacks Projected to Affect 2 Billion Lives in N. Hemisphere - International Business Times

Mon, 11/16/2015 - 09:40
A new study led by Lamont's Justin Mankin looking at the impact of shrinking snowpacks in the northern hemisphere suggests that over 2 billion people could suffer from water shortages.

Ghosts of Oceans Past - Science

Fri, 11/13/2015 - 12:00
Accurately measuring historic sea levels isn't easy. Lamont-Doherty's Maureen Raymo discusses some of the challenges.

How Panama Changed the World - PBS NOVA

Thu, 11/12/2015 - 12:00
Lamont scientist Conny Class and former Lamont post-doc Esteban Gazel scan islands off Panama for clues to how the country formed and its impact on ocean circulation.

6 Places Where Melting Snow Means Less Drinking Water - National Geographic

Thu, 11/12/2015 - 09:23
All basins will likely have less water from snowpack as the planet warms, but some regions will be in worse shape than others. A new study led by Lamont-Doherty's Justin Mankin highlights 32 that are most at risk.

Lamont Leads Student Research Along the Hudson River - Columbia Spectator

Wed, 11/11/2015 - 09:09
“The students are collecting data that is going to be shared with other students; this means that it has to be solid data. That puts an extra responsibility on them,” said Lamont Education Coordinator Margie Turrin. “So it's really mimicked what science is like — that it's done by a community of scientists.”

Yemen Sees Unprecedented Tropical Cyclone Double-Whammy - WX Shift

Tue, 11/10/2015 - 13:14
Yemen suffers back-to-back strikes as Cyclone Megh makes landfall just a week after Cyclone Chapala. Lamont's Suzana Camargo discusses potential El Nino connections to the extreme weather in the region.

One of the Driest Places on Earth, the Sahara, Once Ran with Water - USA Today

Tue, 11/10/2015 - 12:00
A mighty river once coursed through what is now the Sahara Desert, one of the driest places in the world, new satellite images suggest. Lamont's Peter deMenocal says it's evidence that an entire region that lacks rainfall today once supported a large river system.

Tree-Ring Data Chronicles Historic Climate Conditions - Archaeology Magazine

Tue, 11/10/2015 - 07:00
Tree ring chronologies from across Europe and the Mediterranean have been used to create a drought atlas of the Old World that reaches back more than 2,000 years. The atlas, led by Lamont's Ed Cook, is the third providing insights into the Northern Hemisphere, joining the North American Drought Atlas and Monsoon Asia Drought Atlas.

What Do Trees Tell Us about Climate Change? - Christian Science Monitor

Sun, 11/08/2015 - 12:00
The new Old World Drought Atlas uses tree-rings to map droughts and periods of extreme rain through 2,000 years of European history. The project, led by Lamont's Ed Cook and involving dendrochronologists across Europe, joins drought atlases for North America and Asia to create a view of the Northern Hemisphere.