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Dropping the Bomb on Poaching - Natural History Magazine

Featured News - Sun, 09/01/2013 - 11:00
A recap of Lamont-Doherty scientist Kevin Uno's study in PNAS describing a more accurate method for dating elephant ivory.

IcePod Flies over Greenland to Examine Ice Melt - (Rockland, N.Y.) Journal News

Featured News - Thu, 08/29/2013 - 11:00
Story and video summarize test flights of the Lamont IcePod over Greenland.

Greenland Mega Canyon Sends Water to the Sea - Climate Central

Featured News - Thu, 08/29/2013 - 11:00
Lamont's Robin Bell comments on a newly discovered canyon beneath more than a mile of ice in Greenland rivaling the size of the Grand Canyon.

Drones Prove Useful in Polar Regions to Study Melting Ice - The Guardian

Featured News - Tue, 08/27/2013 - 11:00
Lamont's Chris Zappa discusses the potential for unmanned aerial vehicles to do science in dangerous places.

Scientists track Greenland's melting ice sheets with 'icepod' - The Guardian

Featured News - Tue, 08/27/2013 - 11:00
Lamont-Doherty scientists Robin Bell, Chris Zappa, Kirsty Tinto and Nick Frearson appear in this video about the Lamont IcePod project.

Flying Low over Greenland, Icepod Tracks Changes in the Ice Sheet - The Guardian

Featured News - Tue, 08/27/2013 - 11:00
Guardian reporter Suzanne Goldenberg follows the Lamont IcePod team to Greenland as they test their ice-measuring instruments.

Scientists Analyze IcePod Data - Poughkeepsie Journal

Featured News - Mon, 08/26/2013 - 11:00
Final story in a series about the Lamont IcePod project and field testing that took place this summer.

Can Cities Adjust to a Retreating Coastline? - New York Times

Featured News - Thu, 08/22/2013 - 11:00
Lamont-Doherty scientist Klaus Jacob quoted on urban planning around climate change and rising seas.

Study Links Disposal Well to Ohio Tremors - Youngstown Vindicator

Featured News - Tue, 08/20/2013 - 08:02
A new study led by Lamont-Doherty seismologist Won-Young Kim links an underground disposal well for waste fracking fluid in Youngstown, Ohio, to more than a hundred small earthquakes that occurred through 2011.

Digitizing Earth: Developing a Cyberinfrastructure for the Geosciences - Earth magazine

Featured News - Sun, 08/18/2013 - 11:00
Lamont-Doherty scientist Kerstin Lehnert explains how the curating and sharing of digitized data can lead to new discoveries in the earth sciences.

Scientists Study Health of Piermont Marsh Pre-Dredging - (Rockland, N.Y.) Journal News

Featured News - Sun, 08/18/2013 - 11:00
Lamont-Doherty scientist Robert Newton samples sediments at Piermont Marsh to get a snapshot of its health before the new Tappan Zee Bridge is built.

Headstone for an Apocalypse - New York Times

Featured News - Sat, 08/17/2013 - 11:00
Lamont-Doherty geologist Paul Olsen offers a tour of the Palisades, where remnants of massive volcanic eruptions 200 million years ago are visible.

Rising Seas - National Geographic

Featured News - Fri, 08/16/2013 - 11:00
As the planet warms, the sea rises. Coastlines flood. What will we protect? What will we abandon? How will we face the danger of rising seas? Lamont-Doherty scientist Klaus Jacob weighs in.

New Environmental Institute at Jamaica Bay - Queens Chronicle

Featured News - Thu, 08/15/2013 - 10:07
CUNY will operate the institute with help from other institutions: Lamont-Doherty, the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York Sea Grant, Rutgers University, Stevens Institute of Technology, Stony Brook University and the Wildlife Conservation Society.

Seismology as Performance Art

Jim Gaherty installs a seismic station in Masoko as a crowd looks on

Jim Gaherty installs a seismic station in Masoko as a crowd looks on

Ideally, seismic stations are sited in remote, quiet locations away from any possible cultural noise, especially people, who are very noisy (even if they are not New Yorkers). But other considerations besides peace and quiet are important for a good station, particularly security. As a result, we placed most of our stations in towns near schools, hospitals or town halls, where people could keep an eye on them.

We often attract crowds while installing our exotic seismic gear. Field work with an audience has pros and cons. It’s certainly somewhat distracting to labor and sweat under the sun, tinkering with wires and programming equipment with a big crowd in attendance. Some of the sites are in relatively tight spots, so the curious onlookers occupied much of our working space, making for very close quarters. Several days ago, we installed a station next to the village hall in Ndalisi as a small crowd looked on and an animated town meeting took place next door. Loud passionate speeches inside were matched by loud banging outside as we mounted a solar panel for our station on the roof.

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Students from the Ilindi elementary school watch from a distance

But there are very big upsides. People from the villages where we deployed stations have provided an enormous amount of help with building our sites. We have also had abundant opportunities to tell people what we hope to learn about the active tectonic environment where they live. Continental rifting here gives rise to geohazards such as earthquakes and volcanoes. Because we have tried to locate many of our sites near schools, we particularly hope to communicate our science to students and teachers. At the Matema Beach High School, students peppered us with questions as we installed our gear. Their school is just a stone’s throw from the Livingstone Mountains, the surface expression of a major rift fault that has caused large earthquakes. But our seismic installations admittedly may not be entirely positive; today at Kifule Secondary School, students took a long math exam inside while we were making a racket outside. But hopefully the pros out weigh the cons… Even at Kifule, students burst out of classroom after the test all smiles, so apparently we were not too disruptive.

Rescuing Data from the Dark - Earth Magazine

Featured News - Wed, 08/14/2013 - 11:00
Kerstin Lehnert, director of Integrated Earth Data Applications, comments on the need to make data available for future use.

Surface Views of the Southern East Africa Rift Inspire a Look Underground

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Kiejo volcano in the Rungwe Volcanic Province with a cinder cone

Driving around the Rungwe volcanic province in the southern East Africa Rift installing seismometers, we have the chance to observe first hand how geological processes in action create the most dramatic forms at Earth’s surface. Looming volcanoes flanked by cinder cones lie along the rift valley, often very close to rift faults. The Livingstone Mountains, the surface expression of a major fault system that bounds the rift to the east in this area, soar over 1.5 km over the valley below, including Lake Malawi (Nyasa).

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The Livingstone Mountains, which are the surface expression of a major rift fault

The remarkable geological structures evident above ground motivate us to look deeper in the earth. We see volcanoes in particular places at the surface, but where are magmas located at depth below the volcanoes and the rift? Likewise, we see dramatic faults that are helping to thin and break the crust at the surface, but how do they relate to stretching of the entire crust and lithosphere beneath this part of the East Africa rift? And how are the magmas and faults related to one another? These are the core scientific questions motivating our study of the rift around northern Lake Malawi (Nyasa). We hope to use data collected during this program, including the 15 seismic stations that we are deploying now around the Rungwe province, to answer these big questions.

The Sociology of Sandy: Why New York Was So Vulnerable - Live Science

Featured News - Sat, 08/10/2013 - 11:00
Superstorm Sandy demonstrated that New York was unprepared both physically and sociologically for extreme weather threats due to climate change. Lamont's Klaus Jacob comments.

How to Make a Great Ice Age, Again and Again and Again - Science

Featured News - Fri, 08/09/2013 - 11:00
More coverage of Maureen Raymo's study in Nature.

China's Pollution Fight - Xinhua TV

Featured News - Fri, 08/09/2013 - 11:00
Lamont-Doherty geochemists Steven Chillrud and Beizhan Yan discuss air-quality in China where they have been doing research (see segment at 8:10).
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