News aggregator

In Taking Crimea, Putin Gains a Sea of Fuel Reserves - New York Times

Featured News - Sun, 05/18/2014 - 11:00
Lamont-Doherty marine geologist William Ryan, who has studied the Black Sea region extensively, comments on the oil resources within Russia's newly claimed maritime zone around Crimea.

Rockland Scientist Now Geology Heavyweight - (Rockland, N.Y.) Journal News

Featured News - Sun, 05/18/2014 - 11:00
Profile of Lamont-Doherty climate scientist Maureen Raymo, winner of the 2014 Wollaston Medal.

Weak Underbelly

Geopoetry - Fri, 05/16/2014 - 10:44
 New York Times.

A view of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (Landsat). Source: New York Times.

 

Antarctica’s uncertain fuse,
A “weak underbelly,” said Hughes.
Pine Island and Thwaites,
Thrown open, the gates?
As humans, what path should we choose?

The East’s held strong millions of years,
Despite cries of wolf from some peers.
West into the sea,
Up one foot, or three?
Uncertainty some meet with sneers.

Below salty waves, ice is grounded …
In this case, we see fears are founded.
In our defense,
Some centuries hence,
I hope they’ll say reason resounded.

 

__________________________________________

Further reading:

Scientists Warn of Rising Oceans From Polar Melt, Justin Gillis and Kenneth Chang, New York Times.

Marine Ice Sheet Collapse Potentially Underway for the Thwaites Glacier Basin, West Antarctica, Joughin et al., 2014, Science.

Widespread, rapid grounding line retreat of Pine Island, Thwaites, Smith and Kohler glaciers, West Antarctica from 1992 to 2011, Rignot et al., 2014, PNAS.

This is one in a series of poems based on science news, written by Katherine Allen, a researcher in geochemistry and paleoclimate at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.

Droughts May Slash US Maize Gains - Climate News Network

Featured News - Wed, 05/14/2014 - 08:19
Dramatic climate events can change forest composition, says a recent study led by Lamont's Neil Pederson.

'Missing' Mud in Hudson River Holds Climate Change Clue - (Rockland, N.Y.) Journal News

Featured News - Mon, 05/12/2014 - 11:00
Lamont's Tim Kenna and Frank Nitsche go looking for more than a million tons of sediment washed into the Hudson River during Hurricane Irene.

Agency Urges Quake Study for Indian Point - New York Times

Featured News - Fri, 05/09/2014 - 11:00
Lamont's Lynn Sykes on a Nuclear Regulatory Commission recommendation that the reactors at Indian Point be reassessed for earthquake risk.

The New World

Geopoetry - Fri, 05/09/2014 - 09:24
Archaeological expedition in the Peruvian Andes (Kurt Rademaker, University of Maine at Orono).

Archaeological expedition in the Peruvian Andes (Kurt Rademaker, University of Maine at Orono).

 

On a man in the mountains, dusk falls;

Shadows seep upward and spread.

Scaling the black, chiseled walls,

He silently seeks the dead.

 

The Andes, sharp spine of Peru,

Shelter small secrets of stone.

That night, an ancient milieu:

Obsidian, jasper, bone.

 

Into deep history, peer:

Sharp edges of tools, human craft!

Adventurous people lived here,

Climbed, feasted, laughed.

 

Archaeological expedition in the Peruvian Andes (Kurt Rademaker, UMaine)

Archaeological expedition in the Peruvian Andes (Kurt Rademaker, UMaine)

 ____________________________________

Further reading:

Science-2014-Gibbons-567-8 (pdf)

“New Sites Bring the Earliest Americans Out of the Shadows,” Ann Gibbons, Science, 2014

This is one in a series of poems based on science news, written by Katherine Allen, a researcher in geochemistry and paleoclimate at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

The Woman Who Made the First True Map of the Earth - Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey

Featured News - Sun, 05/04/2014 - 11:00
Features the work of the late Lamont scientist Marie Tharp to map earth's ocean floor.

National Academy Elects Three Columbia Faculty Members - Columbia Record

Featured News - Fri, 05/02/2014 - 12:03
Lamont geologist Peter Kelemen is one of three Columbia University faculty members elected this year to the National Academy of Sciences.

Watch Seismic Waves of 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake Roll Through State - LiveScience

Featured News - Fri, 05/02/2014 - 11:00
New research by Lamont's Meredith Nettles confirms that Alaska's 1964 earthquake was the second-largest recorded, at magnitude 9.4.

The Breathing Ocean

Geopoetry - Fri, 05/02/2014 - 10:10
 Jaccard et al. (2013) Science

Image: Jaccard et al. (2013) Science

Far south and farther south, where winds are cold and screaming,
Waters churn, and deep below, old sediments lie dreaming.
A million years’ residuum of life and death and dust,
A library of ice ages reposed upon Earth’s crust.
Very finely teased apart, this elemental tale,
On barium and opal deep into the past we sail.
With all the evidence aligned, a pattern brightly blazes:
Descent into an ice age world proceeds in two key phases.
An orchestra with many players ‘tween warm-cold inflecting;
Tiny cells, abyssal flow, great winds … now, who’s directing?

_________________________________________________

Further reading:

Two Modes of Change in Southern Ocean Productivity Over the Past Million Years, Jaccard, Hayes et al., Science, 2013

This is one in a series of poems based on science news, written by Katherine Allen, a researcher in geochemistry and paleoclimate at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. “The Breathing Ocean” first appeared on Allen’s website on March 22, 2013.

Study Links Wastewater Injection, 2011 Oklahoma Ouake - Associated Press

Featured News - Thu, 05/01/2014 - 11:00
A new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research coauthored by Lamont's Geoff Abers explores why relatively small wastewater injections may have led to a relatively big, magnitude 5.7 earthquake near Prague, Oklahoma in 2011.

Hell’s Chicken

Geopoetry - Fri, 04/25/2014 - 09:00
 Mark Klingler/Carnegie Museum of Natural History

The dinosaur Anzu wyliei. Illustration: Mark Klingler/Carnegie Museum of Natural History

From our great, wild west, those rusty, dusty hills,
Bones of a beast who would give a cowboy chills.
A fierce-looking crest – a mohawk made of bone!
Claws, beak, bony tail, locked within hard stone.
Heavy as a tiger, scary yet absurd;
Anzu, feathered giant: a dino, not-quite-bird.
Mysterious, its habits – egg-eaters? A chance.
But this terrifying creature may have also eaten plants.
We piece together dreams of the verdant late Cretaceous,
Shards, broken clues from the patient and tenacious.
How I wish I could’ve seen this dinosaur humungous;
I guess I’ll have to settle for their relatives among us!

______________________________________________

NVO

© Wikipedia:NVO

A New Large-Bodied Oviraptorosaurian Theropod Dinosaur from the Latest Cretaceous of Western North America, PLoS One, 3/19/14

Dinosaur dubbed ‘chicken from hell’ was armed and dangerous, The Guardian, 3/19/14

National Geographic, 3/19/14

Huffington Post, 3/19/14

This is one in a series of poems based on science news, written by Katherine Allen, a researcher in geochemistry and paleoclimate at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. You can read more on Allen’s website.

Earthquakes and the Texas Miracle - Dallas Magazine

Featured News - Thu, 04/24/2014 - 11:00
Work by Lamont's John Armbruster and colleagues that have linked earthquakes to underground fluid injection cited.

Water Utility Denies Presence of Arsenic - Vietnam News

Featured News - Thu, 04/24/2014 - 09:06
A 2013 study led by Lamont's Lex van Geen found that arsenic had leached its way into a major drinking-water aquifer servicing Hanoi.

Carbon Capture Faces Hurdles of Will, Not Technology - Climate Central

Featured News - Wed, 04/23/2014 - 08:56
A price on carbon is needed before capture and storage of CO2 becomes a viable option, says Lamont's Peter Kelemen.

Long-Awaited Floating Pool Moves Into Filtration Testing Phase - DNA info

Featured News - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 11:00
A floating pool scheduled to open in the East or Hudson Rivers in 2016 will use a filtration system that Lamont's Wade McGillis has helped to design.

MESSENGER Completes 3,000th Orbit of Mercury - Earth Sky

Featured News - Mon, 04/21/2014 - 11:00
MESSENGER has been getting closer to Mercury since March and is now closer to the planet than any spacecraft has been before. "Mercury has stubbornly held on to many of its secrets, but many will at last be revealed,” says Lamont director and MESSENGER principal investigator Sean Solomon.

Woman Narrowly Escapes Deadly Mudslide - Katie Couric Show

Featured News - Mon, 04/21/2014 - 11:00
Lamont's Deputy Director Arthur Lerner-Lam discusses the need for better communication of natural hazard risks.

April Will Be First Month With CO2 Levels Above 400 PPM - Climate Central

Featured News - Mon, 04/21/2014 - 11:00
“On some level, watching these milestones be passed is a lot like watching paint dry,” said Lamont's Jason Smerdon. “The upward march is neither surprising nor unexpected as a direct consequence of human activities; it is only alarming in the sense that it keeps happening unabated.”
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