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OSL Samples at Last

Geohazards in Bangladesh - Tue, 10/20/2015 - 15:02

 

Basu and Céline describing the sediment samples from  a tube well.

Basu and Céline describing the sediment samples from a tube well.

We planned to drill four or five tube wells across the abandoned channel and pick one for OSL dating samples. With the success of yesterday’s tube well drilling, we were optimistic that we could actually do the sampling. We met the drillers in the morning and headed to the next site. Since only two or three people are needed for logging the well, we left Céline and Basu and the rest of us headed off to do a short resistivity line near the first drill site. We scouted it during the drilling of the first well. On the way to the resistivity

Eating a picnic lunch in the field at side of the road.  Vans on either side protected us.  We usually had bananas, oranges, crackers, cakes and on this day pineapple as well.

Eating a picnic lunch in the field at side of the road. Vans on either side protected us. We usually had bananas, oranges, crackers, cakes and on this day pineapple as well.

site, we selected locations for three more wells. Depending on time, we will either drill two and then the sampling well or just three stratigraphic wells. Since it will be only 2 meter spacing between the electrodes, it will be quicker to set up despite less people. We are only trying to image the channel, so we don’t need a larger spacing. The site was also drier than the first two resistivity lines. We laid it out and started collecting data. My only concern was that the route was used as a path for local farmers collecting hay. I didn’t want them to knock off the electrode connections or to have them

A strong rainstorm slowed the work, but couldn't stop it.  Here our driller take a short, wet break.

A strong rainstorm slowed the work, but couldn’t stop it. Here our driller takes a short, wet break.

shocked by the pulses of electricity we sent through the electrodes.

Once the line was running, I headed back to the drill site. They once again found a think mud layer over sand. They continued drilling deeper and found the silt clay that marks the boundary between the Holocene and Pleistocene, when sea level rose following the end of the last ice age. This was a bonus and confirmed that we were on line with the Lalmai anticline farther south. We shifted to the next line, a more difficult location next to a pond, but they managed. I headed back to the resistivity line and found them starting to pack up the equipment. When I went to take a look at the instrument, I found it hadn’t finished. It had run out of memory for recording line and stopped. We quickly reinstalled the electrodes that had been

Attaching the larger 3.5" drill bit to the end of the pipe to enlarge the initial hole so we could sample through it.

Attaching the larger 3.5″ drill bit to the end of the pipe to enlarge the initial hole so we could sample through it.

pulled that we still needed. I deleted some older files that had already been downloaded and restarted acquisition. We had only lost four of 584 command lines.

By the time the second well and the resistivity line were done, it was questionable as to whether we could do the sampling well, which will take longer. The drillers going off for a lunch break settled it. We would do a third tube well today. During the drilling, the skies that had been threatening all day opened up.

Cutting the 3" PVC well liner to keep the hole open until we could sample.  We assembled two different lengths for the samples above and below the mud-sand transition.

Cutting the 3″ PVC well liner to keep the hole open until we could sample. We assembled two different lengths for the samples above and below the mud-sand transition.

The drillers and loggers got completely soaked, but kept going and we completed our five-well transect of the river valley. In the evening we compiled all the logs and discussed a sampling plan. Rather than take four samples in one well, we decided to take two, one above and one below the sand-mud transition in two different wells.

The OSL sample is over 2” wide and the wells we drilled were 1.5” wide. The driller decided it was best to drill a 1.5” well to the depth of the first sample, a few feet above the transition, and then overcore it to 3.5”. Then 3” wide PVC pipe

Hammering the OSL sampler, which is at the end of many auger extension rods.  The sampler fits inside the 3" PVC pipe that had been installed.

Hammering the OSL sampler, which is at the end of many auger extension rods. The sampler fits inside the 3″ PVC pipe that had been installed.

was lowered to keep the well from collapsing. Finally, we put the sampler on the auger rods and lowered it to the bottom of the well. We, actually people younger and stronger than me, pounded the sampler 30 cm into the bottom. Then we all had to pull up on it to get it out. The next step was to extrude the sample in its liner into a thick PVC pipe casing. The sample must be kept in the dark, so this was done inside a black plastic bag. Then the entire sample is wrapped in the black plastic bag and taped securely. The ends and outside of the sample will be discarded and only the core of the sample will be used for dating. Later, sample preparation will all have to be done in a darkroom. I helped sample on my last trip, but the was the first time I was in charge of the procedure. It went well. After the first sample, the drillers drilled to 1 ft. past the contact, overcored to the same depth, added the PVC liner and we sampled again. We

Matt, Céline and myself in a lungi toast the successful OSL sampling with green cocoanut water.

Matt, Céline and myself in a lungi toast the successful OSL sampling with green coconut water.

repeated everything for the second well and we had four OSL samples. We celebrated with green coconuts.

Solving the Mystery of Antarctica's Disappearing Snow - The Weather Network

Featured News - Tue, 10/20/2015 - 12:00
A new study from Lamont-Doherty's Indrani Das has found that about 80 billion tonnes of snow in eastern Antarctica is being vaporized every year by powerful winds.

Can the Climate Really Control Mid-Ocean Ridges? - Ars Technica

Featured News - Tue, 10/20/2015 - 12:00
Analyses of hills paralleling a mid-ocean ridge found variations in height over time lining up with the length of the glacial cycles. A new study from a team led by Lamont-Doherty's Jean-Arthur Olive, however, found flaws when the idea was applied across all oceans.

Drought-Stressed California Forests Face a Radical Shift - Los Angeles Times

Featured News - Tue, 10/20/2015 - 08:56
California could lose as much as 20 percent of its trees to the drought, Carnegie Institution scientists warn. "Think of it as one gigantic ax swing at the forest," said Lamont's Park Williams. "It takes a huge chunk out of the population, and if we see two or three more of these droughts, then that's even more ax swings."

Enroute to Palmer Station

Chasing Microbes in Antarctica - Sun, 10/18/2015 - 21:02

I’m currently sitting in the Dallas airport waiting for a flight to Santiago, Chile, enroute to Palmer Station for the 2015 spring season. Since there is no airfield at Palmer we’ll go in and out by boat (the ARSV Laurence M. Gould). Hopefully we’ll be at the station by October 28 and able to start doing some science not too long after that. There are a couple of reasons why I’m excited about the upcoming season. First, as I discuss in this post, conditions are highly unusual this year, with the extent of sea ice reaching a level not seen at Palmer Station for many years. The reason for this seems to be the persistent warm El Niño conditions in the tropical Pacific Ocean, now complemented by a near zero to negative Southern Annual Mode (negative SAM values are correlated to high sea ice conditions). This increase in sea ice is a counter intuitive but very real effect of global climate change; increased heat in one area of the globe alters global wind patterns and decreases the flow of heat to other areas of the globe. It hasn’t actually been very cold at Palmer Station (the high today was a balmy 24 °F at the time of writing) and how long the sea ice lasts will be depend very much on what happens to winds in the region.

Coming in an era defined by decreasing sea ice along the West Antarctic Peninsula the presence of heavy ice cover could have some interesting ecological impacts. There is a strong likelihood that it will be good for the Adélie penguins, but my primary interest is a little lower down in the food web. I’ll be studying interactions between phytoplankton, the basal food source for the WAP ecosystem, and bacteria at the onset of the spring bloom, hoping to identify cooperative interactions through patterns in bacterial gene expression. Toxic compounds produced by phytoplankton, for example, may be cleaned up by bacterial partners, allowing photosynthesis to proceed more efficiently (ultimately meaning more food for the whole food web). Observing the expression of genes coding for the bacterial enzymes that carry out these processes would be strong evidence for this kind of synergy, which leads me to the second reason I’m excited about the upcoming season.

Electron configuration of superoxide. The extra electron is one more than oxygen an handle, and makes the molecule highly reactive.

Electron configuration of superoxide. The extra electron is one more than oxygen can handle, and makes the molecule highly reactive. Image from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Superoxide.png.

This year I’m joined by Colleen Hansel and Jamie Collins from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute. Colleen and Jamie are chemical oceanographers and experts in identifying specific compounds produced by phytoplankton. Colleen has pioneered a technique to measure superoxide, a damaging free radical, directly in the water column. This is not a trivial undertaking as the half-life of superoxide is only seconds, making traditional oceanographic sampling techniques (such as a Niskin bottle) impossible to employ. Instead we will focus on sampling water in the first few meters of the water column, just above the maximum zone of primary production. Superoxide is produced during photosynthesis, when energetic electrons glob onto free oxygen. The extra electron makes oxygen highly reactive (hence superoxide; it’s a superoxidant) and physiologically damaging. Bacteria have some interesting molecular tools to deal with superoxide however, so perhaps they’ve evolved the ability to perform this service for phytoplankton in exchange for fixed carbon. Coupling observations of gene expression with measures of superoxide and other reactive chemical species is much more powerful, and will tell a much more complete story, than either does alone.

It’s impossible to anticipate how the ice will impact our science plan until we’re at the station and get a feel for how logistics will work this season. Typically sampling at Palmer Station is done by zodiac, which requires reasonably ice-free conditions. The zodiacs can push around a small amount of brash ice but lack the mass (and shrouded propeller) to deal with large quantities. The ice is solid enough this year that we may be allowed to use this ice as a sampling platform – something I’ve got plenty of experience with from previous trips to the Arctic and Antarctic. This is a little out of the norm for Palmer Station however, so we’ll have to see how negotiations proceed.

In our worst-case scenario the ice conditions deteriorate to the point that we can’t sample from it, but not so much that we can push a zodiac through it. The normal sampling procedure in this case is to use a plumbed seawater intake to sample from below the ice (with the added benefit that you can sample from the comfort of the lab), however, this won’t work given the short half-life of superoxide. In this eventuality I think we can salvage the project by focusing on ice algae in place of phytoplankton. Ice algae are essentially phytoplankton which have given up their free-living lifestyle and formed colonies on the underside of the sea ice. These dense mats are a very important food source for juvenile krill, but are understudied in the region given the inconsistent nature of sea ice along the WAP. If we can access some decent ice floes from shore I think we can make a good study of the superoxide gradient, and bacterial response, toward the ice algal colonies. Previous work has shown that ice algae can be under significant oxidative stress so they may have good reason to solicit a little help from bacteria.

Secretary of State Cites Syria Study in Urging 'Ambitious' Climate Deal - Reuters

Featured News - Sun, 10/18/2015 - 12:00
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry cited research involving Lamont's Richard Seager when he talked about climate change connections to the conflict in Syria and threats to food and water security.

Warming World Means More Drought in Horn of Africa - The Ecologist

Featured News - Sun, 10/18/2015 - 12:00
Evidence stretching back 40,000 years shows that global warming will increase drying in a region of East Africa where drought already causes humanitarian crises - dashing earlier hopes of increased rainfall, according to a new study from Lamont's Peter deMenocal.

Tubewells to the Rescue

Geohazards in Bangladesh - Sat, 10/17/2015 - 10:37
One of our cars drives over the makeshift road repair of a sandbag, bricks, wood and rebar while the entire village looks on.

One of our cars drives over the makeshift road repair of a sandbag, bricks, wood and rebar while the entire village looks on.

The next day we went out again for resistivity and augering. Céline picked out two alternative sites that might be drier. We drove through the abandoned valley to the site. We took the direct route and found the local road to be in a terrible state of disrepair. The vans could barely make it through. Then we hit a spot where slumping off each side of the road narrowed it too much. The villagers helped make a temporary road with bricks and wood, but it was still too narrow. Then they filled a sandbag and together with the bricks, wood and other

Céline watches the repair with some of the village women

Céline watches the repair with some of the village women.

handy items we got across. It turned out that since the Upazila (county) voted for the opposition party, they have not had their roads repaired for over a decade. This level of politicization of everything in Bangladesh really hurts the country. When we reached the location of the line, we found that ponds between the road and the fields limited our access. We walked around and found a site next to a brick factory. The line was along an irrigation ditch. Fine to walk on either side, but submerged to mid-shin if you

Standing ankle deep in mud by the resistivity meter.  The smokestack of the brick factory can be seen in the distance.

Standing ankle deep in mud by the resistivity meter. The smokestack of the brick factory can be seen in the distance.

stepped in the middle. The data looked very good after processing. We may have found the top of the Pleistocene as relatively shallow depths consistent with the site being the top of a buried anticline (folded hill).

The delays from the bad road, site searching, and a longer distance to lug the equipment meant that we couldn’t do augering. We came to the conclusion that we have to alternate days of resistivity and drilling. Not enough time in a day to do both properly. That meant

Céline and Basu describe the core brought up in the half-circle auger gouge.

Céline and Basu describe the core brought up in the half-circle auger gouge.

the next day was for augering. We went back to the soccer field site, officially BNGTi1, and started augering with all six of us. We hurried past the section we had already described. To minimize hole collapse, we switched between two augers and tried to work quickly on the descriptions. It took all of us all morning to make it to 4.8 meters. The mud was too hard. We needed to go to plan B. We would drill tube wells and sample inside the wells. Alamgir and Basu went off to the village to find a driller. The rest of us

The three-person drill team preparing the site.  Digging a post hole with rebar, inserting the bamboo pole and digging the mud pit with a kudali.

The three-person drill team preparing the site. Digging a post hole with rebar, inserting the bamboo pole and digging the mud pit with a kudali.

cleaned off the equipment and ourselves at a nearby pond and well and had lunch. After several attempts, they found a driller, but he couldn’t come until 3 p.m. I like to use all the available time I have here, but we now had a few hours break.

The three-person drill team arrived right at 3, unusual in this part of the world. I have seen the drilling technique before, but never the initial set up. In 20 minutes they set two vertical bamboo poles in the ground, tied on the cross piece to make a large H, attached a lever arm and the drill pipe, dug a mud pit for water and a

The driller standing on the frame uses his palm to keep a seal on the pipe as the lever is used to lift and drop the drill pipe.  On the fall, the mud come squirting out of the pipe.

The driller standing on the frame uses his palm to keep a seal on the pipe as the lever is used to lift and drop the drill pipe. On the fall, the mud come squirting out of the pipe.

channel to the actual well location. Then they started drilling. It was so much faster and easier than augering! In 10-20 minutes they were past the depth we reached. We don’t get continuous samples described every 10 cm (4 in.), but the lithology averaged every 5 ft. Muds come up as solid cylinders that we collect, sands as a slurry that we decant. We subdivide the 5 ft. sections if there is a lithology change. The driller caught on quickly to what we wanted and kept us informed of all changes in sediment type, which he could easily feel. Céline and Basu, an experienced logger of tube wells, did most of the sediment work,

As the drilling proceeds, the top of the pipe drops to ground level and then a new pipe is added to continue the drilling

As the drilling proceeds, the top of the pipe drops to ground level and then a new pipe is added to continue the drilling

with some help from the rest of us. As expected, the section was primarily mud with some silt. We reached the sands from the abandoned channel at 42 ft., a little deeper than I expected but reasonable. It was still early enough for us to do another. Alamgir and I scouted a second location as they finished and packed up the equipment. We completed that one, with the sands at only 20 ft. North of our transect looks like there was an island splitting the channel in two. Here would have been downstream of the island, so we

Céline and Matt walk back after a satisfying day.

Céline and Matt walk back after a satisfying day.

expected it to be shallow. Finally, things were going well. Using tubewells, we should have plenty of time to drill several stratigraphic wells and then pick one for sampling. We celebrated with dinner at the local Chinese restaurant.

paprica v0.20

Chasing Microbes in Antarctica - Fri, 10/16/2015 - 14:30

A couple of months ago I published paprica v0.11, a set of scripts for conducting a metabolic inference from a collection of 16S rRNA gene reads.  This approach allows you to estimate the functional capabilities of a microbial community if you don’t have access to a metagenome or metatranscriptome.  Paprica started as a method for a paper I was writing but eventually became complex enough to warrant it’s own publication.  Paprica v0.11 reflected this origin – it produced nice results but was cludgy and cumbersome.

Over the last couple of weeks I’ve given paprica a complete overhaul and am happy to introduce v0.20.  There are a number of major differences between v0.11 and v0.20, but the most significant difference is a more clear division between construction of the database for those who want full control (and access to the PGDBs) and sample analysis, which can proceed with only the provided, light-weight database (however you will not have access to the PGDBs).  Executing paprica v0.20 is as easy as (from your home directory, for the provided file test.fasta):

git clone https://github.com/bowmanjeffs/genome_finder.git cd genome_finder chmod a+x paprica_run.sh ./paprica_run.sh test

One really important distinction between this version and v0.11 is that metabolic pathways are NOT predicted directly on internal nodes.  This was done for reasons of organization and efficiency, but I’m not sure that it made much sense to do this anyway.  Instead the pathways likely to be found for an internal node are inferred from their appearance in terminal daughter nodes (that is, the completed genomes that belong to the clade defined by the internal node).  If a given pathway is present in some specified fraction (0.90 by default) of the terminal daughters it is included in the internal node.  You can change this value by modifying the appropriate variable in pathway_profile.txt.  Some (including myself) might like to have a PGDB for an internal node for purposes of visualization or modeling.  In the near future I’ll release a utility to create a PGDB for an internal node on demand.

Some other major improvements…

  • Fewer dependencies.  For the scripts called in paprica_run.sh you need pplacer, seqmagick, infernal, and some Python modules that you should probably have anyway.
  • Improved reference tree.  I’m still working on this, but the current method uses RAxML for phylogenetic inference and Infernal for aligment, which seems to work much better than the previous (albeit much faster) combo of Fasttree and Mothur.  Thanks to Eric Matsen for helpful suggestions in this regard.
  • More genome parameters.  I have a particular interest in how genome parameters (e.g. length, coding density, etc.) are distributed in the environment.  Paprica gives you a whole list of interesting metrics for the terminal and internal nodes.

Paprica is still in heavy development and I have a lot of improvements planned for future versions.  If you try v0.20 I’d love to know what you think – good, bad, or otherwise!  You can create an issue on Github or email me.

What's Behind the Disappearance of Antarctic Snow? - Christian Science Monitor

Featured News - Fri, 10/16/2015 - 12:00
A new study led by Lamont's Indrani Das shows that strong winds are shifting vast amounts of Antarctica’s snow into the sea or the atmosphere.

Air Guard's IcePod Aircraft Departs for ‘Deep Freeze’ - Air National Guard

Featured News - Fri, 10/16/2015 - 07:00
The takeoff of the New York Air National Guard’s LC-130 ski-equipped aircraft on Oct. 16 marks the official start of the 109th Airlift Wing’s 28th season of support to science research at the South Pole. It carries the Lamont-built IcePod for exploring under the Antarctic ice.

Climate Cycles Didn’t Shape Ocean’s Abyssal Hills - Science

Featured News - Thu, 10/15/2015 - 19:32
A new study led by Lamont-Doherty's Jean-Arthur Olive says faulting, not sea level rise and fall due to climate change, shaped the texture of the sea floor.

SCAR session on microbial ecology

Chasing Microbes in Antarctica - Thu, 10/15/2015 - 16:31

Along with colleagues from New Zealand, Argentina, and Malaysia I’m convening a session on microbial ecology and evolution at the upcoming biennial SCAR meeting in Kuala Lumpur (because there’s no better place to talk about ice than the tropics).  If this sounds like your sort of thing check it out!

S23. Microbes, diversity, and ecological roles Walter MacCormack, Argentina; Charles Lee, New Zealand; Chun Wie Chong, Malaysia; Jeff Bowman, USA

The ecology of Antarctica is largely shaped by microbes, with microbial life, including prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes, serving as the main drivers of ecosystem function.  Given this, it is perhaps surprisingly that our current understanding of Antarctic biota has been derived primarily from studies of metazoans. Despite major advances in the field of Antarctic microbiology in recent years there remains a knowledge gap in our understanding of the distribution, functions, and adaptations of Antarctic microbes. There is a general consensus that Antarctic microorganisms are highly diverse, and in many cases encompass endemic gene pools with unique physiological and genetic adaptations to the extreme conditions of their environment. Relatively recently, the advent of ‘omics platforms has allowed researchers to observe these processes in great detail. This session welcomes submissions on all aspects of microbial ecology and evolution in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean. This includes ‘omics-based approaches to understanding prokaryotic and unicellular eukaryotic diversity, function, adaptation, as well as laboratory and field-based studies of microbial and ecological physiology. Special consideration will be given for abstracts addressing the following issues: (1) Microbial biogeography, functional redundancy, and ecosystem services; (2) Trophic connectivity between prokaryotes and eukaryotes; (3) Cold adaptation strategy and evolution; and (4) Multiple ‘omics integration addressing systems biology of Antarctic ecosystems.

The Mystery of Antarctica's Strange Disappearing Snow - Live Science

Featured News - Thu, 10/15/2015 - 12:00
New research led by Lamont-Doherty's Indrani Das has found that current regional climate models don't take into account how wind affects snow accumulation in Antarctica.

3 Years After Hurricane Sandy, Is New York Prepared for the Next Great Storm? - The Nation

Featured News - Wed, 10/14/2015 - 12:00
New York is spending $20 billion to protect its shores from sea-level rise, but that may not be enough. The Nation talked to Lamont's Klaus Jacob.

Forecast for East Africa: Dry, With a Chance of Pirates - On Earth

Featured News - Wed, 10/14/2015 - 12:00
A new study from Lamont's Peter deMenocal and colleagues finds the Horn of Africa is drying and will continue to get drier. That's likely to drive poverty and piracy.

Pani, Pani Everywhere

Geohazards in Bangladesh - Wed, 10/14/2015 - 07:46

 

House in the middle of the wet fields. During the summer monsoon, it will be an island connected by the bamboo bridge.  In a month it will be connected by dry land

House in the middle of the wet fields. During the summer monsoon, it will be an island connected by the bamboo bridge. In a month it will be connected by dry land.

Six of us headed out on Oct. 8 for Brahmanbaria, northeast of Dhaka. Our target is a large winding abandoned river valley that we believe used to be the course of the Meghna River. Currently, the much smaller Titas River flows northward in the channel. Why would a river in the world’s largest delta flow the wrong way? We think that an earthquake uplifted the Comilla District area to the south. That caused the Meghna River to shift westward to its present channel and the Titas to flow up the old channel. A well drilled in the channel in 2012 shows a layer of muds overlying coarser sands.

The large abandoned channel we hoped to work in is completely flooded.

The large abandoned channel we hoped to work in is completely flooded.

We think the sands represent sediments from the old Meghna and the muds are sediments filling up the channel. We will be using resistivity to image the channel and an auger to first sample and describe the sediments and then to collect samples for dating.

Finding organic matter to date by carbon 14 is rare, so we plan to use a technique called OSL dating. OSL stands for Optically Stimulated Luminescence. Electrons from the radioactivity of all rocks get trapped in defects in quartz grains. However, they

A group of children play in a pond while we try to figure out where to find land dry enough to work in.

A group of children play in a pond while we try to figure out where to find land dry enough to work in.

are so weakly trapped that sunlight can release them. When traveling down the river, the electrons are released and then start accumulating when they are buried. By measuring the light released by the sample when optically stimulated, we can calculate the time since the sample last was exposed to light. By sampling the top of the sands and the bottom of the muds, we can date the time the river switches, or avulsed. The details of the procedure to get an OSL age are pretty complicated, but if this works, we

Our resistivity meter set up in a rice field.  We were able to collect data at the cost of very muddy legs.

Our resistivity meter set up in a rice field. We were able to collect data at the cost of very muddy legs.

will date the earthquake that caused the river avulsion.

This technique is new to me. I helped with some sampling the last time I was here, but I have not been in charge of doing it. I am also more comfortable with the quantitative data from the resistivity than the qualitative geologic descriptions we will make of the sediments. Luckily I have a good team with me, Céline, my postdoc, Matt, my former teaching assistant, and Alamgir, Atik and Basu from Dhaka University. I have spent time in the field with Alamgir and

Spools of the cable we use along where we collected the profile.  We used the slightly raised boundaries between fields for access, to avoid stepping on the crop and to stay a little less muddy.

Spools of the cable we use along where we collected the profile. We used the slightly raised boundaries between fields for access, to avoid stepping on the crop and to stay a little less muddy.

Atik before. Alamgir has conducted his own resistivity surveys. Basu was recommended to me as someone with a lot of experience in describing sediments.

We set out early in the morning for the four-hour drive. However, when we reached the river valley, we found it was almost completely flooded. We walked out on an elevated road and there was pani—the Bangla word for water—everywhere. The abandoned valley is still slightly lower in elevation than the surrounding land. Even that land has the rice fields flooded with shallow water, although the

Céline and Basu examine a core of samples brought up by the auger gouge.

Céline and Basu examine a core of samples brought up by the auger gouge.

boundaries between the fields are above water. But our main target is submerged! In the winter this will be dry land, but we are a month and a half too early. A number of scheduling issues required me to come now, although I knew it was too soon after the monsoon, but I didn’t expect so much of the land to still be flooded. Time to come up with an alternative plan.

For the resistivity, we need long straight stretches of dry land. We decided to

Kids playing soccer on the open field where we did our first auger hole.  The auger was hit by the ball several times.

Kids playing soccer on the open field where we did our first auger hole. The auger was hit by the ball several times.

do it west of the valley to try to image the thickness of the entire Holocene (last 10,000 years) section. It should vary because of the folding of the strata from the tectonics. Mapping the thickness will help us to map the position of the buried fold. For augering, we only need a small patch of land to stand on. To find it we headed south towards where the valley was uplifted more and might be drier. Not as ideal as the original location, but possible. The next morning we headed farther south and crossed the river valley. It was drier and we noted some potential augering sites. We continued to a location for resistivity. The six of us set up the >350 m long resistivity line, then Céline, Basu and I headed back to try augering while the resistivity data was collected. The augering proved very difficult. We were very slow describing the core that the auger brought up, and while we were doing it the hole would start to collapse. The muddy sediment was very stiff, and we had to hammer the auger in. We only got to 2.7 m when we stopped, nowhere near the depth we needed. Things were pretty discouraging.

Sea ice bacteria review published

Chasing Microbes in Antarctica - Tue, 10/13/2015 - 12:25

I’m really excited (and relieved) to report that my review on the taxonomy and function of sea ice microbial communities was recently published in the journal Elementa.  The review is part of a series on biological exchange processes at the sea ice interface, by the SCOR working group of the same name (BEPSII).  I’m deeply appreciative of Nadja Steiner, Lisa Miller*, Jaqueline Stefels, and the other senior members of BEPSII for letting (very) junior scientists take such an active role in the working group.  I conceived the review in a foggy haze last year while writing my dissertation, when I assumed that there would be “plenty of time” for that kind of project before starting my postdoc.  Considering that I didn’t even start aggregating the necessary data until I got to Lamont I’m also deeply appreciative of my postdoctoral advisor for supporting this effort…

The review is really half review, half meta-analysis of existing sea ice data.  The first bit, which draws heavily on the introduction to my dissertation, describes some of the history of sea ice microbial ecology (which goes back to at least 1918 for prokaryotes).  From there the review moves into an analysis of the taxonomic composition of the sea ice microbial community, based on existing 16S rRNA gene sequence data, takes a look at patterns of bacterial and primary production in sea ice, and then uses PAPRICA to infer metabolic function for the observed microbial taxa (after 97 years we still don’t have any metagenomes for sea ice – let alone metatranscriptomes – and precious few isolates).

There is a lot of info in this paper but I hope a few big points make it across.  First, we have a massive geographical bias in our sea ice samples.  This is to be expected, but I don’t think we should just accept it as what has to be.  More disconcerting, there has been very little effort to integrate physiological measures in sea ice (such as bacterial production) with analyses of microbial community structure.  A major exception is the work of the Kaartokallio group at the Finnish Environmental Group, but their work has primarily taken place in the Baltic Sea (an excellent system, but very different from the high Arctic and coastal Antarctic).  This all translates into work that needs to be done however, which is a good thing… we are just barely at the point where we can make reasonable hypothesis regarding the functions of these communities.

Taken from Bowman, 2015. Sampling locations for sea ice studies that have collected community structure data (blue), ecological physiology data (red), and both (orange). Note the strong sampling bias, particularly in the Antarctic. The black arrows point to the locations of the two community structure studies (at the time of writing) that we sufficiently deep to actually describe community structure.

Taken from Bowman, 2015. Sampling locations for sea ice studies that have collected community structure data (blue), ecological physiology data (red), and both (green). Note the strong sampling bias, particularly in the Antarctic. The black arrows point to the locations of the two community structure studies (at the time of writing) that we sufficiently deep to actually describe community structure.

*This image of Lisa pops up a lot. If you can identify what, exactly, is going on in this picture I’ll buy you a beer.

Winter Blooms in the Arabian Sea - NASA

Featured News - Tue, 10/13/2015 - 12:00
Lamont's Joaquim Goes and Helga do Rosario Gomes have been studying blooms in the Arabian Sea, where a tiny organism and its tenants have made an unexpected appearance that could harm other marine life that the region depends on for food.

Hurricane-Like Antarctic Winds May Contribute to Sea Level Rise - Europa Press

Featured News - Tue, 10/13/2015 - 12:00
Hurricane-force winds remove large amounts of snow in Antarctica, which might increase the estimates of how much the frozen continent contributes to sea level rise. Cites research by Lamont-Doherty's Indrani Das.

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