News aggregator

Rising Seas - National Geographic

Featured News - Fri, 08/16/2013 - 11:00
As the planet warms, the sea rises. Coastlines flood. What will we protect? What will we abandon? How will we face the danger of rising seas? Lamont-Doherty scientist Klaus Jacob weighs in.

New Environmental Institute at Jamaica Bay - Queens Chronicle

Featured News - Thu, 08/15/2013 - 10:07
CUNY will operate the institute with help from other institutions: Lamont-Doherty, the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York Sea Grant, Rutgers University, Stevens Institute of Technology, Stony Brook University and the Wildlife Conservation Society.

Seismology as Performance Art

Jim Gaherty installs a seismic station in Masoko as a crowd looks on

Jim Gaherty installs a seismic station in Masoko as a crowd looks on

Ideally, seismic stations are sited in remote, quiet locations away from any possible cultural noise, especially people, who are very noisy (even if they are not New Yorkers). But other considerations besides peace and quiet are important for a good station, particularly security. As a result, we placed most of our stations in towns near schools, hospitals or town halls, where people could keep an eye on them.

We often attract crowds while installing our exotic seismic gear. Field work with an audience has pros and cons. It’s certainly somewhat distracting to labor and sweat under the sun, tinkering with wires and programming equipment with a big crowd in attendance. Some of the sites are in relatively tight spots, so the curious onlookers occupied much of our working space, making for very close quarters. Several days ago, we installed a station next to the village hall in Ndalisi as a small crowd looked on and an animated town meeting took place next door. Loud passionate speeches inside were matched by loud banging outside as we mounted a solar panel for our station on the roof.

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Students from the Ilindi elementary school watch from a distance

But there are very big upsides. People from the villages where we deployed stations have provided an enormous amount of help with building our sites. We have also had abundant opportunities to tell people what we hope to learn about the active tectonic environment where they live. Continental rifting here gives rise to geohazards such as earthquakes and volcanoes. Because we have tried to locate many of our sites near schools, we particularly hope to communicate our science to students and teachers. At the Matema Beach High School, students peppered us with questions as we installed our gear. Their school is just a stone’s throw from the Livingstone Mountains, the surface expression of a major rift fault that has caused large earthquakes. But our seismic installations admittedly may not be entirely positive; today at Kifule Secondary School, students took a long math exam inside while we were making a racket outside. But hopefully the pros out weigh the cons… Even at Kifule, students burst out of classroom after the test all smiles, so apparently we were not too disruptive.

Rescuing Data from the Dark - Earth Magazine

Featured News - Wed, 08/14/2013 - 11:00
Kerstin Lehnert, director of Integrated Earth Data Applications, comments on the need to make data available for future use.

Surface Views of the Southern East Africa Rift Inspire a Look Underground

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Kiejo volcano in the Rungwe Volcanic Province with a cinder cone

Driving around the Rungwe volcanic province in the southern East Africa Rift installing seismometers, we have the chance to observe first hand how geological processes in action create the most dramatic forms at Earth’s surface. Looming volcanoes flanked by cinder cones lie along the rift valley, often very close to rift faults. The Livingstone Mountains, the surface expression of a major fault system that bounds the rift to the east in this area, soar over 1.5 km over the valley below, including Lake Malawi (Nyasa).

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The Livingstone Mountains, which are the surface expression of a major rift fault

The remarkable geological structures evident above ground motivate us to look deeper in the earth. We see volcanoes in particular places at the surface, but where are magmas located at depth below the volcanoes and the rift? Likewise, we see dramatic faults that are helping to thin and break the crust at the surface, but how do they relate to stretching of the entire crust and lithosphere beneath this part of the East Africa rift? And how are the magmas and faults related to one another? These are the core scientific questions motivating our study of the rift around northern Lake Malawi (Nyasa). We hope to use data collected during this program, including the 15 seismic stations that we are deploying now around the Rungwe province, to answer these big questions.

The Sociology of Sandy: Why New York Was So Vulnerable - Live Science

Featured News - Sat, 08/10/2013 - 11:00
Superstorm Sandy demonstrated that New York was unprepared both physically and sociologically for extreme weather threats due to climate change. Lamont's Klaus Jacob comments.

How to Make a Great Ice Age, Again and Again and Again - Science

Featured News - Fri, 08/09/2013 - 11:00
More coverage of Maureen Raymo's study in Nature.

China's Pollution Fight - Xinhua TV

Featured News - Fri, 08/09/2013 - 11:00
Lamont-Doherty geochemists Steven Chillrud and Beizhan Yan discuss air-quality in China where they have been doing research (see segment at 8:10).

Buried in Muck, Clues to Future NYC Drought - Mother Jones

Featured News - Fri, 08/09/2013 - 11:00
Outside New York, Lamont-Doherty scientist Dorothy Peteet thinks muddy marshes hold the secrets of future climate change.

Ice Ages: Why North America Is Key to Their Coming and Going - Christian Science Monitor

Featured News - Wed, 08/07/2013 - 11:00
Scientists have long tried to figure out what causes the ebb and flow of ice ages. New data suggests a novel explanation for why the mile-thick blankets of ice retreat so quickly: They become too heavy, as Lamont's Maureen Raymo explains.

Montreal Protocol Is a Rare Gift That Keeps Giving - Motherboard

Featured News - Mon, 08/05/2013 - 11:00
Coverage of Journal of Climate study by former Lamont graduate student Yutian Wu, Richard Seager and Lorenzo Polvani.

Imaging beneath the southernmost volcanoes in the East Africa Rift

The last time we visited the southern part of the East Africa Rift, we were responding to an unusual series of earthquakes in December 2009 that shook northern Malawi. The faults responsible for these events had not produced any earthquakes historically, and thus caught everyone by surprise. The unexpected occurrence of earthquakes on these faults highlights our poor overall understanding of how the African continent is slowly stretching and breaking apart.

This time, we return to this part of the rift system as a part of a more comprehensive effort to understand the underpinnings of this continental rift using a spectrum of geological and geophysical tools and involving a big international team of scientists from the U.S., Tanzania and Malawi. In the coming three weeks, we plan to deploy ~15 seismometers in southwest Tanzania around the Rungwe volcanic province, the southernmost volcanism in the East Africa Rift system. These stations will record small local earthquakes associated with active shifting of faults and moving of magmas at depth. They will also record distant earthquakes that can be used to create images of structures beneath Earth’s surface and map the faults and magmas.

Rungwe seismic deployment

Map showing elevation and lake depth, locations of volcanoes (red triangles, from Smithsonian Global Volcanism Program), major faults (black lines) with planned locations for seismometers. We plan to deploy 15 stations (light blue circles) in the next three weeks around the Rungwe volcanic province. Dark blue circles show tentative locations of stations to be deployed in the summer of 2014.

 

Only 144 Miles, Yet Worlds Apart

Peering Through Polar Ice - Sun, 08/04/2013 - 11:25
The icepod team at Raven Camp, Greenland Icesheet. (Photo M. Turrin)

The IcePod team at Raven Camp, Greenland ice sheet. Photo: 2nd Lt. C. Martin, NYANG

144 miles separates Kangerlussuaq from Raven Camp. Not far really, just 144 miles – like traveling from the southern tip of New York City up to Albany. Flying at 270 knots we can be there in about half an hour, no time at all, and yet to the casual observer they seem worlds apart.

Kangerlussuaq Greenland on the Sondrestrom Fjord. (Photo M. Turrin)

Kangerlussuaq Greenland on the Sondrestrom Fjord. Photo: M. Turrin

Kanger sits nestled in the arm of Sondrestrom Fjord, where over the years Russell Glacier has found the soft belly in the rock base, wearing the surface down flat and pushing the rock flour out to sea. Currently the tip of Russell Glacier is a full 20 kms (14 mi) up the fjord. In the summer months, as research teams move through the village, glacial meltwater fills the carved channel that borders the small town.

Meltwater Rushing Behind Kangerlussuaq, Greenland

“Summer meltwater from Russell Glacier rushes around the edge of Kangerlussuaq.”

Although modest in size by our standards, Kangerlussuaq is a transportation hub for Greenland, and has a steady year-round population of ~500 residents.

Population at Raven Camp. (Photo M. Wolovick)

Raven Camp population posting -  “Pop. 2.” Photo: M. Wolovick

Raven Camp sits high up on the Greenland Ice Sheet on a frozen bed of ice, almost 2 kms thick (~1 mi) and millions of years in the making. At almost 7,000 feet of elevation, no seasonal change will bring a rushing river or a population to match that of Kangerlussuaq, but summer research does bring an influx of summer scientists, swelling the population beyond the posted total of 2. With a handful of tents and collapsible housing structures, Raven Camp is a summer town.”

Icepod collecting data as part of the Raven Camp grid. (Photo M. Turrin)

IcePod tucked up for transit to Raven Camp, where it will be lowered to complete the survey grid over the ice landing strip. Photo: M. Turrin

Today we fly to Raven Camp to complete a survey grid over the ice landing strip. A year ago the camp staff detected several cracks (crevasses) in the ice running perpendicular to the airstrip. Crevasses are to be expected around the edges of an ice sheet, where the ice is faster flowing, however, at this elevation and this far inland it is more unusual. Published data for ice movement in this area shows at the base the ice is moving about 2.5 cm a day, while at the surface ice is moving closer to 7 cm a day. It is no surprise that the ice at the base moves more slowly, a result of the increased friction at the bed causing the ice to stick and slow.

Dye 2 facility at the Raven Camp established during the cold war as one of four sites in Greenland that were part of the U. S. Distant Early Warning Line, a system of radar stations to warn of incoming Soviet bombers. (Photo M. Wolovick)

Dye 2 facility at the Raven Camp established during the cold war as one of four sites in Greenland that were part of the U. S. Distant Early Warning Line, a system of radar stations to warn of incoming Soviet bombers. Photo: M. Wolovick

Currently measuring only 10 cms across, it certainly doesn’t seem that this could cause much trouble. But if the crevasses are deep and continue to widen, they will threaten the landing strip. A team of scientists has been collecting measurements on the ground to see if these rates are changing (2013 polarfield blog1); our job is to survey the area with our instruments. The Shallow Ice Radar and the infrared camera collect the depth of the cracks and the temperature differences as the cracks move deeper into the ice. Pulling all this data together will help us understand what is happening to the ice in this area.

The Shallow Ice Radar collects images through the upper layer of ice. (Photo M. Turrin)

The Shallow Ice Radar collects images through the upper layer of ice. Photo: M. Turrin

Our flight grid will be flown low, at 1,000 ft. above the ice surface, one third our normal survey elevation. Two East/West lines are flown perpendicular to the landing strip at 600 meters apart. Then three tie lines are flown parallel to the runway at 100 meters apart.

 

 

 

 

Once the grid is complete, we land on the airstrip, testing the seal on the pod door and collecting some camp cargo. The landing is smooth.

Nick Frearson, lead engineer on the Icepod project prepares to check the pod for snow after the ice runway landing at Raven Camp. (Photo M. Turrin)

Nick Frearson, lead engineer on the IcePod project, prepares to check the pod for snow after the landing on the ice runway at Raven Camp. Photo: M. Turrin

Temperatures today at Raven are a warm 1°C. The snow has lost some of the crispness we had experienced when we had landed in April to install a GPS on the ice. The pod is inspected. The camp looks all but abandoned, yet a snow vehicle appears with cargo that is stashed and secured for transit. While the cargo is loaded, we snap a quick IcePod team photo.

Cargo is loaded into the back of the LC130 at Raven Camp. The aircraft is not turn off during ice landing - all loading is done quickly. (Photo M. Turrin)

Cargo is loaded into the back of the LC130 at Raven Camp. The aircraft is not turned off during ice landing — all loading is timed with the ground for a quick exchange.(Photo: M. Turrin

The new eight-bladed propellers on Skier 92 do their job and the take-off is smooth for our return to Kangerlussuaq, just 144 miles, 30 minutes of transit, and yet seemingly worlds apart.

1 For more on the science being collected on the ground on ice movement: http://www.polarfield.com/blog/tag/greenland-ice-cap/

For more on IcePod: http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Greenhouse Gas May Find Home Underground - (Bergen, NJ) Record

Featured News - Fri, 08/02/2013 - 12:42
Lamont-Doherty geologist Paul Olsen comments on a $13 million study of the Newark Basin's carbon-storage potential funded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

IcePod Flies High in Arctic Test - Poughkeepsie Journal

Featured News - Fri, 08/02/2013 - 12:28
More coverage on the Lamont IcePod team's work in Greenland from the Poughkeepsie Journal's John Ferro.

Is Fracking in New Jersey's Future? - (Bergen, NJ) Record

Featured News - Fri, 08/02/2013 - 11:36
Lamont-Doherty geologist Paul Olsen comments on the Newark Basin's potential natural gas reserves.

How a Fickle Climate Made Us Human - Science

Featured News - Fri, 08/02/2013 - 11:00
Lamont-Doherty scientist Peter deMenocal comments on ongoing research linking Africa's changing climate to human evolution.

Out of the Kenyan Mud, an Ancient Climate Record - Science

Featured News - Fri, 08/02/2013 - 11:00
Lamont-Doherty scientist Peter deMenocal discusses research linking climate change in East Africa to human evolution.

Magma Can Take 'Highway from Hell' to Fuel Volcanic Eruptions - Los Angeles Times

Featured News - Thu, 08/01/2013 - 12:48
Coverage of study in Nature by Lamont's Philipp Ruprecht and Terry Plank.

Bizarre Crystals Reveal Underground Magma 'Highway' - Christian Science Monitor

Featured News - Thu, 08/01/2013 - 11:00
Coverage of Philipp Ruprecht and Terry Plank's study in Nature.
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