News aggregator

Scientists See Link Between Global Warming, California Drought - McClatchy

Featured News - Thu, 08/20/2015 - 12:00
New research from Lamont's Park Williams shows the fingerprints of global warming in worsening the California drought and suggests a future of more dryness for the suffering state.

Long-Suffering California Can Blame Drought on Global Warming - Guardian

Featured News - Thu, 08/20/2015 - 12:00
A new report from Lamont's Park Williams finds climate change intensified the drought in California from 2012 to 2014 and predicts ‘enhanced drought’ throughout 21st century.

How Much Has Global Warming Worsened California's Drought? We Now Have a Number - The Conversation

Featured News - Thu, 08/20/2015 - 12:00
In an essay for The Conversation, Lamont-Doherty's Park Williams describes his new study on the California drought.

Climate Change is Deepening California's Drought Crisis by as Much as a Quarter - International Business Times

Featured News - Thu, 08/20/2015 - 12:00
Lamont-Doherty's Park Williams discusses the first study to quantify just how much global warming is exacerbating California's drought.

The Climate Change "Bully" in California's Drought - Climate Central

Featured News - Thu, 08/20/2015 - 12:00
Lamont-Doherty's Park Williams discusses his study on the California drought. "From a method standpoint, it’s a big advancement," he says. "It’s the first time I know of that data has been parsed apart this way for any drought on the planet."

Climate Change Is Intensifying the California Drought - The Hill

Featured News - Thu, 08/20/2015 - 12:00
Lamont-Doherty's Park Williams explains how global warming has worsened the California drought, now entering its fourth year.

Scientists Strengthen Link Between Climate Change and Drought - High Country News

Featured News - Thu, 08/20/2015 - 12:00
In a new study led by Park Williams, researchers found that unusually hot temperatures attributable to anthropogenic climate change intensified the California drought.

Scientists Say Global Warming Has Made California Drought Worse - Washington Post

Featured News - Thu, 08/20/2015 - 12:00
Lamont's Park Williams explains that while natural weather patterns that push away atmospheric moisture that carries rain are normal for California, warming adds to the resulting dryness and heat. A small amount of moisture stored in plants and the soil evaporates into the drier atmosphere.

Park Williams on How Global Warming has Worsened the California Drought - Democracy Now

Featured News - Thu, 08/20/2015 - 12:00
Lamont-Doherty's Park Williams talks with Democracy Now about a new study gauging the role of a warming climate in worsening the California drought.

California Can Blame Climate Change for Fifth of Its Drought - Bloomberg

Featured News - Thu, 08/20/2015 - 09:00
California can blame about a fifth of the state’s record drought on climate change, says a new study led by Lamont's Park Williams.

Scientists Figure Out Just How Much of California's Drought Can Be Blamed on Climate Change -

Featured News - Thu, 08/20/2015 - 09:00
Climate change has made the California drought measurably worse - likely between 15 and 20 percent, says Lamont's Park Williams.

California Drought: Climate Change Plays a Role, Study says. But How Big? - Los Angeles Times

Featured News - Thu, 08/20/2015 - 09:00
A group of researchers led by Lamont's Park Williams have estimated the extent to which climate change has worsened the California drought: as much as 27 percent.

Global Warming Worsened the California Drought, Study Confirms - Xinhua

Featured News - Thu, 08/20/2015 - 07:00
Human-caused global warming has measurably worsened California's crippling drought, according to a new study led by Lamont's Park Williams.

How Climate Change Robs California of Scant Water Supplies - Christian Science Monitor

Featured News - Thu, 08/20/2015 - 07:00
A new study led by Lamont's Park Williams is the first to put numbers to the idea that increasing heat drives moisture from the ground, intensifying drought conditions in places like California.

Global Warming Has Worsened California's Drought - USA Today

Featured News - Thu, 08/20/2015 - 07:00
Man-made global warming has made California's historic drought 15% to 20% worse than it would have been and will likely make future droughts even worse, a new study led by Lamont's Park Williams says.

Diamonds Form from Ancient, Underground Seawater, Study Suggests - CBC

Featured News - Wed, 08/19/2015 - 12:00
Microscopic, ugly diamonds from the Northwest Territories are illuminating how diamonds are made. A new study involving Lamont's Yakovv Weiss explains.

How Diamond Formation Depends on the Ocean - Hakai Magazine

Featured News - Wed, 08/19/2015 - 12:00
Lamont geochemist Yaakov Weiss shows in a new study how diamonds from Canada’s Northwest Territories owe their existence in part to ancient salt water.

Tracing the Arctic

TRACES of Change in the Arctic - Wed, 08/19/2015 - 00:07
Leaving Dutch Harbor

The U.S. Coast Guard cutter Healy leaving Dutch Harbor, Alaska, and heading to the high Arctic for the GEOTRACES research cruise. It doesn’t take long to move from a landscape of steep carved cliffs to one of endless waves on an Arctic passage. Photo: T. Kenna

Dutch Harbor Alaska is located on that long spit of land that forms the Aleutian Islands of Western Alaska. Research vessels launch from this location and head northeast into the Bering Sea on their way to the Bering Strait, the gateway to the Arctic.

map of Dutch Harbor

Dutch Harbor, Alaska (from

Our research cruise is part of the international Arctic GEOTRACES program, which this summer has three separate ships in the Arctic Ocean. The Canadian vessel headed north in early July, and the German vessel will follow a week behind the Healy. Each will be following a different transect in the Arctic Ocean to collect samples. The U.S. vessel has 51 scientists on board, each with a specific sampling program. We will focus our time in the western Arctic, entering at the Chukchi Sea. (Follow the expedition here.)

What is GEOTRACES studying? The program goal is to improve our understanding of ocean chemistry through sampling different trace elements in the ocean waters. Trace elements can be an asset or a liability in the marine system, providing either essential nutrients for biologic productivity, or toxic inputs to a rapidly warming system. This part of the larger program is focused on the Arctic Ocean, the smallest and shallowest of the world’s oceans and the most under siege from climate change. Results from this cruise will contribute to our understanding of the processes at work in the Arctic Ocean, providing both a baseline of contaminants for future comparisons as well as insights into what might be in store for our future.

The land surrounding the Arctic Ocean is like a set of cradling arms, holding the ocean and the sea ice in a circular grasp. Within that cradle is a unique mix of waters, including freshwater from melting glacial ice and large rivers, and a salty mix of relatively warm Atlantic water and cooler Pacific water. Our first sample station lasts over 24 hours and focuses on characterizing the chemistry of the water flowing into the Arctic from the Pacific Ocean. This is critical for locking down  the fluxes and totals of numerous elements in the Arctic.

Map of sea ice

Daily map from the ship showing sea ice cover. Yellow is the marginal ice, and the red is heavy ice. The location of the Healy is visible at the lower edge of the photo at the edge of the red dot.

In the past the “embrace” of the Arctic land has served as a barrier, holding in the sea ice, which is an important feature in the Arctic ecosystem. In 2007, however,  winds drove large blocks of sea ice down the Fram Stait and out of Arctic. In recent years the Arctic sea ice has suffered additional decline, focusing new attention on the resource potential of this ocean.

Unexpectedly this year, the sea ice is projected to be thick along the proposed cruise track, thick enough that it might cause the ship to adjust her sampling plan.


Walrus resting on Arctic sea ice. Photo: T. Kenna

The walrus in the above image are taking advantage of the Arctic sea ice. Walrus use the ice to haul out of the water, rest and float to new locations for foraging. Walrus food of preference is mollusks, and they need a lot of them to keep themselves satisfied, eating up to 5,000 a day, using the sea ice as a diving platform. As the ship moves further from shore, we will lose their company.

Margie Turrin is blogging for Tim Kenna, who is reporting from the field as part of the Arctic GEOTRACES, a National Science Foundation-funded project.

For more on the GEOTRACES program, visit the website here.

Glacial Earthquakes May Hold Clues to Future Sea Level Rise - Weather Channel

Featured News - Mon, 08/17/2015 - 12:00
Glacial earthquakes could help us measure how much ice is lost from glaciers around the world, Lamont-Doherty's Meredith Nettles says.


Sugar - Sun, 08/16/2015 - 22:33
... so my mother can see I'm wearing a hardhat (Hi Mom).  Galen getting done, Natalie with commentary, Yogi counting it down ...



Subscribe to Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory aggregator