News aggregator

Ocean Currents Could Shed Light on Flight 370 Mystery - Business Insider

Featured News - Fri, 07/31/2015 - 12:00
Ocean currents could have carried debris from a missing Malaysia Airlines flight around the Indian Ocean to Reunion Island, says Lamont's Arnold Gordon.

Study Finds Drought Impacts Forests More than Previously Thought - Deseret News

Featured News - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 12:00
A study of drought and its effects on the growth of forests finds that it is taking longer for the trees to recover than previously thought, with an impact on carbon sinks. The study's authors include Lamont-Doherty's Park Williams.

Ocean Currents Suggest Plane Debris Could Be from Missing Airliner MH370 - Mashable

Featured News - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 12:00
Lamont-Doherty's Arnold Gordon explains how currents in the Indian Ocean could have carried debris from the area off Australia where Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 is believed to have disappeared to Reunion Island, where a part from a large plane was found on a beach.

How Currents Could Have Carried Flight MH370 Debris Across Indian Ocean - NPR

Featured News - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 11:00
Lamont-Doherty's Arnold Gordon explains ocean circulation patterns and how floating wreckage from an airliner that disappeared off the coast of Australia could have reached Reunion Island near Madagascar.

Ramping up for bigger, badder SUGAR Part 2

Sugar - Tue, 07/28/2015 - 23:11
We are in Georgia gearing up for the second phase of field work for the SUGAR project, which will involve collecting seismic refraction data along two profiles spanning eastern Georgia. In the coming weeks, we’ll deploy thousands of small seismometers along county and state roads across the region, which will record sound waves generated by a series of controlled blasts. We can use the sound waves to make pictures of geology beneath the surface. Geological structures beneath Georgia record the most profound events involved in the formation and evolution of the eastern North America continent. In particular, we want to image an ancient suture between Africa and North America that formed when these continents collided to create the supercontinent Pangea, frozen magma bodies from one of the biggest volcanic outpourings in Earth’s history, and continental stretching and thinning that lead to the breakup of Pangea and formation of the Atlantic Ocean.

We collected similar data in western Georgia last year during the first phase of the SUGAR experiment imaging these same features. During that field program, we deployed 1200 seismometers and set off 11 controlled blasts along a 250-mile-long line, which felt like a big project at the time. But this year, we will go even bigger! In eastern Georgia, we need to span an even larger area to encompass our geological targets. One of the reasons that we need to look at a bigger swath of the earth is that there is a debate about the location of the suture here – it could be as far north as Milledgeville, GA or as far south as Baxley, GA. (In case you are not up on your Georgia geography, those towns are ~100 miles apart). This means longer profiles, more instruments and more blasts! We will deploy a total of 3000 seismometers and detonate 25 blasts along two profiles. The longer profile spans 350 miles from Winder, GA to the Florida-Georgia state line near St Mary’s Georgia. Stay tuned!

Donna Shillington, LDEO

Lamont's Suzanne Carbotte Named to American Geophysical Union's 2015 Fellows - AGU

Featured News - Tue, 07/28/2015 - 12:00
AGU fellows are honored for making exceptional scientific contributions in the fields of Earth and space sciences. Lamont-Doherty marine geophysicist Suzanne Carbotte was named to the 2015 class.

Interview: Climate Change in Central Asia - The Diplomat

Featured News - Thu, 07/23/2015 - 12:00
Lamont-Doherty's Benjamin Orlove discusses the repercussions of climate change in Central Asia.

Stay Tuned for SUGAR 2!!

Sugar - Wed, 07/22/2015 - 21:57
In just a few short weeks a mass of students and scientists will descend on southern Georgia with work boots and sunscreen in hand to take part in the second portion of the SUGAR active source experiment.  Make sure to stay tuned for regular updates on our progress and to learn more about the exciting science that motivates this amazing field expedition!

Hospitalizations Increase Near Fracking Sites, Study Shows - Medical Xpress

Featured News - Fri, 07/17/2015 - 12:00
A new study involving Lamont-Doherty researchers finds hospitalization rates up for heart, neurological and skin complaints in areas of Pennsylvania's Marcellus Shale region with large concentrations of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking.

Urbanization Threatens Drought-Reducing Clouds in California - EOS

Featured News - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 12:00
Since the mid-20th century, increased urbanization along the southern California coast has raised nighttime temperatures, resulting in less morning fog and cloud cover. Highlights research by Lamont-Doherty's Park Williams, Richard Seager, and Ben Cook.

The Collision that Changed the World, by Wally Broecker - Elementa

Featured News - Wed, 07/15/2015 - 12:00
Fifty million years ago, India collided with an island arc that rimmed Eurasia. It was the collision that changed the world, writes Lamont-Doherty's Wally Broecker.

What's Next for the UNOLS Research Fleet? - EOS

Featured News - Tue, 07/14/2015 - 12:00
EOS looks at what's next for the UNOLS research fleet, a partnership between the U.S. government and universities exploring the oceans, featuring Lamont-Doherty's RV Marcus G. Langseth.

Backward-Moving Glacier Helps Explain Glacial Earthquakes - Environmental Research Web

Featured News - Wed, 07/08/2015 - 12:00
New insights into glacier behavior could improve our ability to predict future sea-level rise in a warming climate says an article focusing on research by Lamont-Doherty's Meredith Nettles.

Rainforest Wildfires & Melting Ice Caves: High Temps Are Causing Havoc in Washington - Vice News

Featured News - Wed, 07/08/2015 - 12:00
Lamont-Doherty's Tim Creyts explains how ice caves form. High temperatures have led to partial collapses of ice caves in Washington state.

America's Next Crippling Drought: Why California Could Be a Glimpse into the Future - Salon

Featured News - Sat, 07/04/2015 - 12:00
Lamont-Doherty scientist Jason Smerdon weighs in on megadroughts and projections for the future under climate change.

Climate and the Khan - Discover Magazine

Featured News - Wed, 07/01/2015 - 12:00
A fortuitous shift in weather patterns fueled the Mongol Empire's explosive growth 800 years ago. Today, a less favorable change is underway, as work by Lamont-Doherty researchers shows.

Breathe In: Putting Green Walls to the Test - Architect Magazine

Featured News - Wed, 07/01/2015 - 12:00
Working with researchers, doctors, and immunologists from several organizations, including Lamont-Doherty, the designers are studying the relationship between pathogens in the indoor environment and biodiversity to try to bring fresh outdoor air in.

To Grasp What We're Doing to the Planet, You Need to Understand this Gigantic Measurement - Washington Post

Featured News - Wed, 07/01/2015 - 12:00
Measuring ice loss in gigatons. Includes glacial earthquake research by Lamont-Doherty's Meredith Nettles.

Glacial Earthquakes Help Researchers Track Massive Ice Loss - Los Angeles Times

Featured News - Fri, 06/26/2015 - 12:00
Lamont-Doherty scientists tracking glacial earthquakes in Greenland have managed to crack open the mysterious dynamics of calving icebergs.

Icy Earthquakes Can Help Scientists Track Shrinking Glaciers - Christian Science Monitor

Featured News - Fri, 06/26/2015 - 12:00
Lamont-Doherty scientist Meredith Nettles offers a new explanation for Greenland’s glacial earthquakes, which have become increasingly frequent in recent years.



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