News aggregator

The Breathing Ocean

Geopoetry - Fri, 05/02/2014 - 10:10
 Jaccard et al. (2013) Science

Image: Jaccard et al. (2013) Science

Far south and farther south, where winds are cold and screaming,
Waters churn, and deep below, old sediments lie dreaming.
A million years’ residuum of life and death and dust,
A library of ice ages reposed upon Earth’s crust.
Very finely teased apart, this elemental tale,
On barium and opal deep into the past we sail.
With all the evidence aligned, a pattern brightly blazes:
Descent into an ice age world proceeds in two key phases.
An orchestra with many players ‘tween warm-cold inflecting;
Tiny cells, abyssal flow, great winds … now, who’s directing?

_________________________________________________

Further reading:

Two Modes of Change in Southern Ocean Productivity Over the Past Million Years, Jaccard, Hayes et al., Science, 2013

This is one in a series of poems based on science news, written by Katherine Allen, a researcher in geochemistry and paleoclimate at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. “The Breathing Ocean” first appeared on Allen’s website on March 22, 2013.

Study Links Wastewater Injection, 2011 Oklahoma Ouake - Associated Press

Featured News - Thu, 05/01/2014 - 11:00
A new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research coauthored by Lamont's Geoff Abers explores why relatively small wastewater injections may have led to a relatively big, magnitude 5.7 earthquake near Prague, Oklahoma in 2011.

Hell’s Chicken

Geopoetry - Fri, 04/25/2014 - 09:00
 Mark Klingler/Carnegie Museum of Natural History

The dinosaur Anzu wyliei. Illustration: Mark Klingler/Carnegie Museum of Natural History

From our great, wild west, those rusty, dusty hills,
Bones of a beast who would give a cowboy chills.
A fierce-looking crest – a mohawk made of bone!
Claws, beak, bony tail, locked within hard stone.
Heavy as a tiger, scary yet absurd;
Anzu, feathered giant: a dino, not-quite-bird.
Mysterious, its habits – egg-eaters? A chance.
But this terrifying creature may have also eaten plants.
We piece together dreams of the verdant late Cretaceous,
Shards, broken clues from the patient and tenacious.
How I wish I could’ve seen this dinosaur humungous;
I guess I’ll have to settle for their relatives among us!

______________________________________________

NVO

© Wikipedia:NVO

A New Large-Bodied Oviraptorosaurian Theropod Dinosaur from the Latest Cretaceous of Western North America, PLoS One, 3/19/14

Dinosaur dubbed ‘chicken from hell’ was armed and dangerous, The Guardian, 3/19/14

National Geographic, 3/19/14

Huffington Post, 3/19/14

This is one in a series of poems based on science news, written by Katherine Allen, a researcher in geochemistry and paleoclimate at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. You can read more on Allen’s website.

Earthquakes and the Texas Miracle - Dallas Magazine

Featured News - Thu, 04/24/2014 - 11:00
Work by Lamont's John Armbruster and colleagues that have linked earthquakes to underground fluid injection cited.

Water Utility Denies Presence of Arsenic - Vietnam News

Featured News - Thu, 04/24/2014 - 09:06
A 2013 study led by Lamont's Lex van Geen found that arsenic had leached its way into a major drinking-water aquifer servicing Hanoi.

Carbon Capture Faces Hurdles of Will, Not Technology - Climate Central

Featured News - Wed, 04/23/2014 - 08:56
A price on carbon is needed before capture and storage of CO2 becomes a viable option, says Lamont's Peter Kelemen.

Long-Awaited Floating Pool Moves Into Filtration Testing Phase - DNA info

Featured News - Tue, 04/22/2014 - 11:00
A floating pool scheduled to open in the East or Hudson Rivers in 2016 will use a filtration system that Lamont's Wade McGillis has helped to design.

MESSENGER Completes 3,000th Orbit of Mercury - Earth Sky

Featured News - Mon, 04/21/2014 - 11:00
MESSENGER has been getting closer to Mercury since March and is now closer to the planet than any spacecraft has been before. "Mercury has stubbornly held on to many of its secrets, but many will at last be revealed,” says Lamont director and MESSENGER principal investigator Sean Solomon.

Woman Narrowly Escapes Deadly Mudslide - Katie Couric Show

Featured News - Mon, 04/21/2014 - 11:00
Lamont's Deputy Director Arthur Lerner-Lam discusses the need for better communication of natural hazard risks.

April Will Be First Month With CO2 Levels Above 400 PPM - Climate Central

Featured News - Mon, 04/21/2014 - 11:00
“On some level, watching these milestones be passed is a lot like watching paint dry,” said Lamont's Jason Smerdon. “The upward march is neither surprising nor unexpected as a direct consequence of human activities; it is only alarming in the sense that it keeps happening unabated.”

Black Holes

Geopoetry - Fri, 04/18/2014 - 14:54
 SCIENCE VIDEOLAB

Image Credit: Science Videolab

In most observed galaxy hearts,
Massive black holes reside,
Formed from dark-baryon parts,
As huge stars collapse or collide.
Telescopes secrets divulge,
Hinting at coevolution,
The key: a galaxy’s bulge?
We do not yet know the solution.
Whence the crucial gas-fuel
With which to feed a black hole?
Do galaxies, holes often duel?
Or play a more symbiont role?
Next, we tackle all spectra;
Our tools, from low to high climb,
Sensing waves from far plectra,
Over the whole Hubble time.

__________________________________________

Further reading:

The Formation and Evolution of Massive Black Holes, M. Volonteri, Science, 2012

This is one in a series of poems based on science news, written by Katherine Allen, a researcher in geochemistry and paleoclimate at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. “Black Holes” first appeared on Allen’s website on Aug. 6, 2012.

Future Droughts Worse than Expected - Astrobiology

Featured News - Thu, 04/17/2014 - 07:27
A new study is helping astrobiologists understand how climate change may shape the future of life on Earth. Coverage of a study in Climate Dynamics by Lamont's Benjamin Cook, Jason Smerdon and Richard Seager.

Floods: Holding Back the Tide - Nature News

Featured News - Wed, 04/16/2014 - 18:13
With the Ganges–Brahmaputra delta sinking, the race is on to protect millions of people from future flooding. Work of Lamont's Michael Steckler cited.

Tree Rings Record History of Drought - Discover magazine

Featured News - Wed, 04/16/2014 - 11:00
Using tree rings, Lamont's Neil Pederson and colleagues have created a record of droughts dating back hundreds to thousands of years.

Human Activity May Have Triggered Fatal Italian Earthquakes, Panel Says - Science

Featured News - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 11:00
Lamont-Doherty seismologist Geoff Abers comments on the possibility that a pair of deadly earthquakes in Italy in 2012 were triggered by petroleum extraction at a local oil field.

Lords of the Past

Geopoetry - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 09:21
 Vassil/Alias Collections.

Paraceraurus trilobite, Ordovician, from the Volchow River, Russia. Photo: Vassil/Alias Collections.

With life, legged and finned, Earth had been teeming,
Slitherers, predators, graceful trees tall …
Now, of these species, we are only dreaming:
Glossopteris, trilobites, eurypterids, all.

Creatures of intrigue, lords of the past!
How did they grow; their color, what hue?
Why did some perish, and why did some last?
In Earth’s litholibrary, sometimes a clue.

Catastrophe beautifully carved into stone,
Graveyards ‘neath graveyards, so deep do we ply,
Silent yet eloquent, shadows of bone,
The greatest extinction, the big one – but why?

Deserts and oceans spanned latitudes wide,
Lava erupted as oceans of fire,
What means of death? It’s hard to decide:
Heat, acid, darkness, a host of things dire.

Yet from these strange ashes (if ashes they be)
Life rose up gorgeously, brilliantly new!
From lucky survivors, a vast, branching tree;
Some tendrils persisted, and weird, wild things grew!

Time is the key to death and new life,
And time can lie hidden, awaiting fresh eyes.
A haze of uncertainty, cut with a knife –
From zircon in China, chronologies rise!

To stand at the Permo-Triassic, it seems,
One faces a shockingly sharp, razor brink;
Of rapid events, the Meishan bed screams …
The “Great Dying” flew by in a mere cosmic blink.

_______________________________________________

 Further reading:

An extinction in the blink of an eye, MIT News, 2/10/14

High-precision timeline for Earth’s most severe extinction, PNAS, 2014

Earth’s Greatest Killer Finally Caught, LiveScience, 12/12/13

This is one in a series of poems based on science news, written by Katherine Allen, a researcher in geochemistry and paleoclimate at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. You can read more on Allen’s website.

Goa and Climate Change - Times of India

Featured News - Thu, 04/10/2014 - 11:00
Cites research by Lamont-Doherty microbiologists Joaquim Goes and Helga do Rosario Gomes.

Wollaston Award Winner Maureen Raymo's Climate Symphony - Yale Forum

Featured News - Tue, 04/08/2014 - 11:00
Lamont climate scientist Maureen Raymo featured in a video interview.

A ’64 Quake Still Reverberates - New York Times

Featured News - Mon, 04/07/2014 - 11:00
“Plate tectonics was originally proposed as a kinematic theory — it was about displacements, movements and velocities,” said Lamont deputy director Arthur Lerner-Lam. “The great accomplishment was to link earthquakes to those movements.”

Droughts to Become More Severe, Frequent Over Nearly a Third of Earth: Study - Weather Channel

Featured News - Mon, 04/07/2014 - 11:00
"For agriculture, the moisture balance in the soil is what really matters," said study co-author Jason Smerdon, a climate scientist with Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. "If rain increases slightly but temperatures also increase, drought is a potential consequence," he told The Hindu.
Syndicate content