Featured news

PBS SciTech Now
Thursday, April 21, 2016

Over the last decade, federal spending on research and development as a percentage of our country’s GDP has been declining. PBS SciTech Now talks with Lamont's Peter deMenocal.

Scientific American
Thursday, April 21, 2016

Lamont's Maureen Raymo talks about the value of determining the heights of prehistoric shorelines for projecting future sea level rise.

Climate Central
Wednesday, April 20, 2016

The World Surf League has created a unique partnership with climate scientists at Lamont that could help the sport, the ocean and spur a new research model.

Smithsonian Magazine
Wednesday, April 20, 2016

As the planet’s peat swamps come under threat, the destiny of their stored carbon remains a mystery. Lamont's Jonathan Nichols takes the Smithsonian on a tour of the challenge.

Cosmos Magazine
Monday, April 18, 2016

Constant gravitational pressures on the icy surface of Jupiter’s moon Europa generate much more heat than previously thought, which may force a rethink about the chemistry of the liquid water ocean below the surface, says Lamont's Christine McCarthy.

La Repubblica
Sunday, April 17, 2016

In a column appearing in Italy's La Repubblica, Lamont's Marco Tedesco discusses the darkening of Greenland and how that contributes to a cycle of melting. The column is written in Italian.

The Desert Sun
Thursday, April 14, 2016

Global warming will require big changes in how we management water, the Desert Sun writes. “In general, what a measure like this is telling us is that our historical reliance on snow is untenable in a future climate," said Lamont's Justin Mankin.

Washington Post
Wednesday, April 13, 2016

The vast Greenland ice sheet is seeing a record-breaking level of melt for so early in the season. “The potential implications, in terms of runoff and so on, they alter the memory of the snowpack, the potential implications can be big either for the same season or future seasons,” said Lamont's Marco Tedesco.

BBC
Monday, April 11, 2016

If climate change continues, we can expect a large rise in sea level this century, and it will only get worse in the centuries to come. The BBC talks with Lamont's Maureen Raymo.

Alaska Dispatch
Saturday, April 9, 2016

A landslide last October detected in Alaska by Lamont's Colin Stark and Göran Ekström might be the biggest non-volcanic landslide recorded in North American history. It also created a wave that sheared alders more than 500 feet up the opposite hillside.

Grind TV
Friday, April 8, 2016

The World Surf League just launched a non-profit, WSL PURE. It will help researchers at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory study climate change and the ocean.

Surfing Life
Wednesday, April 6, 2016

The World Surf League has just launched a whole new wing of their organisation, WSL PURE. This time, it's all about giving back. The new philanthropic wing is putting $1.5 million in first-year funding into ocean science at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.

Washington Post
Tuesday, April 5, 2016

“More melting creates more darkening and accelerates the melting itself — a positive feedback effect,” Lamont's Marco Tedesco said.

CU's New York Stories
Monday, April 4, 2016

“You won’t open your mouth in the Hudson River, and that’s symbolic of a lot of things,” says Wade McGillis, an associate research professor at Lamont. “We want to figure out if we can restore it to a pristine system. If you don’t know what you’re doing to it, you can’t figure out ways to fix it. ”

New York Times
Saturday, April 2, 2016

Lamont's Adam Sobel reminds readers to differentiate between weather and climate. If you really want to know what is going on with climate change, he said, look at the long-term averages over large areas. Do not be fooled by short-term weather fluctuations.

Washington Post
Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Lamont's Robin Bell talks about the urgent need for Antarctic research. A recent study found that, with very high carbon emissions, melting ice from Antarctica could cause seas to rise 1.14 meters (3.74 feet), give or take 36 centimeters, by 2100 — and much more by 2500.

The New Yorker
Monday, March 28, 2016

The New Yorker talks to a team of scientists, including Lamont Associate Research Professor Mike Kaplan and Adjunct Associate Research Scientist Aaron Putnam, who are researching how quickly the ice in the Himalayas is melting.

Fox News
Thursday, March 24, 2016

The devastation caused by earthquakes is evident all across the world, but could something like this happen in our area? Fox news talks with Jim Gaherty.

Geographical
Wednesday, March 23, 2016

When plants respire, they contribute a massive carbon flux to the atmosphere so their response to higher temperatures is a major concern for scientists. A new study from Lamont's Kevin Griffin finds plants might not respond to warming as thought.

Guardian
Monday, March 21, 2016

Higher temperatures in France are producing exceptional vintages, but the run will come to an end if global warming continues at the current rate, a new study from Lamont's Ben Cook suggests.

Pages