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Christian Science Monitor
Saturday, March 19, 2016

"When it comes down to climate and carbon sequestration, these are global problems," says Lamont's Kevin Griffin.

The Tribune
Saturday, March 19, 2016

Worried about how climate change will affect rainfall in the coming decades, some San Luis Obispo residents are calling on the city to stop allowing developers to build new homes — at least until the city recalculates its future water supply.

JNS
Friday, March 18, 2016

A combination of water from rainfall, recycling of wastewater, desalination of seawater, and a large-scare water conservation campaign helped Israel get through what research from Lamont's Ben Cook shows is the region's worst drought in more than 900 years.

CNN
Thursday, March 17, 2016

Scientists are increasingly able to attribute aspects of extreme weather to the overall change in the climate, as John Sutter discusses with Lamont's Park Williams.

Science
Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Compared with trees suddenly exposed to hot temperatures, acclimated trees may release far less CO2 at night, a new study suggests. Science talks with Lamont's Kevin Griffin.

Fusion
Monday, March 14, 2016

Lamont's Peter Kelemen discusses ways of using mantle rocks as natural carbon capture and storage solutions.

Washington Post
Friday, March 11, 2016

Our science has reached the point where we can look for the human influence on climate in single weather events, and sometimes find it, writes Lamont's Adam Sobel.

National Geographic
Thursday, March 10, 2016

A new study led by Lamont's Marco Tedesco finds that the reflectivity, or albedo, of Greenland’s ice sheet could decrease by as much as 10 percent by the end of the century, potentially leading to significant sea-level rise.

Science News
Wednesday, March 9, 2016

The dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans is taking over in the Arabian Sea, posing a potential threat to its ecosystem. Science News talks with Lamont's Joaquim Goes.

BBC
Wednesday, March 9, 2016

The BBC talks with Lamont's Bob Newton about the Billion Oyster Project, an effort to bring oysters back to New York harbor.

Eos
Wednesday, March 9, 2016

Satellite data and modeling reveal a trend toward coarser-grained, more-energy-absorbent snow on Greenland, as a new paper by Lamont's Marco Tedesco explains.

Discovery News
Monday, March 7, 2016

Before its planned crash into Mercury last year, NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft gave scientists a parting gift: In its final orbits, MESSENGER confirmed that Mercury’s dark hue is due to carbon. Discovery talked with Lamont Director Sean Solomon, who led the MESSENGER mission.

Fox News
Friday, March 4, 2016

Greenland can’t seem to catch a break. In a study led by Lamont's Marco Tedesco, researchers have found that the surface has gotten darker over the past two decades, meaning it’s absorbing more solar radiation, which is further increasing snow melt.

Don't Panic Geocast
Friday, March 4, 2016

Lamont graduate student Hannah Rabinowitz talks in a podcast about Lamont's Research Is Art project, Girls' Science Day and other science outreach.

Washington Post
Thursday, March 3, 2016

A new study from Lamont's Marco Tedesco shows that Greenland's ice sheet is “darkening,” or losing its ability to reflect both visible and invisible radiation, as it melts more and more, the research finds. That means it’s absorbing more of the sun’s energy — which then drives further melting.

The Guardian
Thursday, March 3, 2016

Greenland’s vast ice sheet is in the grip of a dramatic “feedback loop” where the surface has been getting darker and less reflective of the sun, helping accelerate the melting of ice and fuelling sea level rises, new research led by Lamont's Marco Tedesco has found.

CNN
Thursday, March 3, 2016

A new study led by Lamont's Ben Cook finds that the drought that began in 1998 in the Levant is probably the region's worst in 900 years.

Mashable
Wednesday, March 2, 2016

The drought that played a role in triggering the catastrophic Syrian Civil War was the worst such climate event in at least the past 900 years, according to a new study published this week and led by Lamont's Ben Cook. Mashable also talks with Richard Seager.

Wall Street Journal
Wednesday, March 2, 2016

A cluster of low-magnitude earthquakes in the New York region has piqued the interest of residents, while some geologists predict the increase in temblors will continue and a large-scale one could be coming. Lamont's Won-Young Kim discusses the science.

Le Figaro
Tuesday, March 1, 2016

Since the ravages of Hurricane Sandy in 2012 and the massive floods in the U.S. East Coast, New York has focused on creating a new ecosystem to contain the risks of sea level rise. Le Figaro talks with Lamont's Klaus Jacob and Adam Sobel. (In French)

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