Lamont-Doherty
on the Map

Since 1949, scientists at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory have trekked to the far corners of the globe. Over oceans, continents and at both poles, Lamont-Doherty scientists have mapped large swaths of the planet to gain insight into its history and evolution. In honor of their accomplishments, many natural features bear their names, from faults on the seafloor to frozen islands off Antarctica.

The U.S. Board on Geographic Names decides what names go on natural features on official government maps. Naming authorities exist in other countries, too, but for the most part their names coincide with U.S. designations. In the continental United States, natural-feature names are restricted to people who have been dead at least five years. But in Antarctica and on the vast seafloor, the rules are a bit looser. Thus, many features there bear the names of living scientists.

Explore the Map

Lamont-Doherty on the Map

Since 1949, scientists at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory have trekked to the far corners of the globe. Over oceans, continents and at both poles, Lamont-Doherty scientists have mapped large swaths of the planet to gain insight into its history and evolution. In honor of their accomplishments, many natural features bear their names, from faults on the seafloor to frozen islands off Antarctica.

The U.S. Board on Geographic Names decides what names go on natural features on official government maps. Naming authorities exist in other countries, too, but for the most part their names coincide with U.S. designations. In the continental United States, natural-feature names are restricted to people who have been dead at least five years. But in Antarctica and on the vast seafloor, the rules are a bit looser. Thus, many features there bear the names of living scientists.