LDEO Research Blogs

  • We are conducting a seismic program in the Deep Galicia Basin of the northeast Atlantic Ocean west of Spain. The goal of the proposed research is to collect data necessary to study the rifted continental to oceanic crust transition in the Deep Galicia Basin west of Spain.

  • Polar ice is home to large communities of algae that thrive in the frigid Arctic environment, including microscopic bacteria, unicellular algae, diatoms, worms and crustaceans. These tiny organisms have a big impact on the marine ecosystem and the entire planet -- including us. Andy Juhl and Craig Aumack, scientists from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, are in Barrow, Alaska studying algae in and below sea ice, and how our warming climate may impact these important organisms.
  • Scientists at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory have designed a set of ice imaging instruments small enough to hitch a ride on planes flying over both poles on routine missions. This spring, the IcePod will begin collecting data over Greenland from the wing of a New York Air National Guard LC130 plane. IcePod will help scientists to understand how quickly the ice sheets are changing as climate warms and what this will mean for global sea levels.

  • This is the blog for the NSF-funded project studying climate, fire & forest history in Mongolia led by Neil Pederson of Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and Columbia University, Amy Hessl of West Virginia University, Peter Brown of Rocky Mountain Tree Ring Research and Baatarbileg Nachin, head of the Department of Forest Science in the School of Biology and Biotechnology at the National University of Mongolia.

  • Arctic peat bogs have been absorbing carbon for thousands of years, but will this continue as the poles heat up? Warmer temperatures could cause bogs to decay, sending billions of tons of carbon back into the air. But a warmer climate might also improve growing conditions, allowing the bogs to take up more carbon than before. A team of scientists will travel to Alaska's remote North Slope to collect peat bog samples to understand how climate and carbon uptake have varied over the past 15,000 years and what this might mean for the future.