LDEO Research Blogs

  • The South China Sea is one of the most geopolitically contested marine realms on earth. But it is also of keen interest to geologists who want to understand how this ocean basin, bordered by China, the Philippines, Malaysia and Vietnam, opened up. On an International Ocean Discovery Program cruise aboard the JOIDES Resolution, scientists will drill through seafloor sediments to understand how the basin reached its present form. Marine geologist Trevor Williams of Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory is directing downhole logging operations. Follow his dispatches from the ship here.

  • Driven by processes in the deep earth over millions of years, the East African Rift is slowly tearing the continent apart, producing earthquakes and volcanoes along its 2,400-mile track. A scientific team including Donna Shillington, James Gaherty and Cornelia Class of Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory is working in Malawi and Tanzania to understand the causes, the long-term evolution, and the real-time hazards.

  • We are conducting a seismic program in the Deep Galicia Basin of the northeast Atlantic Ocean west of Spain. The goal of the proposed research is to collect data necessary to study the rifted continental to oceanic crust transition in the Deep Galicia Basin west of Spain.

  • Polar ice is home to large communities of algae that thrive in the frigid Arctic environment, including microscopic bacteria, unicellular algae, diatoms, worms and crustaceans. These tiny organisms have a big impact on the marine ecosystem and the entire planet -- including us. Andy Juhl and Craig Aumack, scientists from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, are in Barrow, Alaska studying algae in and below sea ice, and how our warming climate may impact these important organisms.
  • Scientists at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory have designed a set of ice imaging instruments small enough to hitch a ride on planes flying over both poles on routine missions. This spring, the IcePod will begin collecting data over Greenland from the wing of a New York Air National Guard LC130 plane. IcePod will help scientists to understand how quickly the ice sheets are changing as climate warms and what this will mean for global sea levels.