Events

Monday, August 17, 2020 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Online
This event is part 1 of a special 3-part series for educators on the Hudson River Estuary. Presenters: Margie Turrin, Director of Educational Field Programs, and Laurel Zaima, Education Program Assistant, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University Target Audience: Grades 1 - 5 educators Description: Fish in the Hudson may share a watery habitat, but aside from that, fish can vary in every way imaginable. They are uniquely adapted to their niche in the ecosystem. Learn how different adaptations benefit different species and expand your love of these charismatic vertebrates as we do different fish activities while we learn all about fish. (Note that while we are focusing on the Hudson this fish activity applies more widely).
Tuesday, August 18, 2020 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Online
This event is part 2 of a special 3-part series for educators on the Hudson River Estuary. Presenters: Margie Turrin, Director of Educational Field Programs, and Laurel Zaima, Education Program Assistant, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University Target Audience: Grades 6-8 educators Description: The Hudson is a critical habitat for many threatened and endangered species. Some of the most damaged and highly urban areas have rebounded to provide rich habitat for flora and fauna that is of value not only locally, but regionally along the North Atlantic coastline. In this session, learn to match the species to their habitats using digital maps and species data.
Tuesday, August 18, 2020 12:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Online
Please join LDEO Interim Director Maureen Raymo for the second event in the Summer Stars Lecture Series, with Hope Jahren. Talk title: "Be as a Tree Planted by the Waters: The Magic of Roots, Leaves, and Everything in Between” Abstract: "Trees are the oldest, biggest, and most successful creatures in the world. Using energy from the sun, and carbon from the air, they have thrived on land for more than four hundred million years. Hear about the amazing and unique methods that plants around us use to establish, grow, flourish, and defend themselves. Learn how plants are much more than food, medicine, and wood — they form the living, striving foundation of Planet Earth.” Bio: “Prof. Hope Jahren is an award-winning scientist who has been pursuing independent research in paleobiology since 1996, when she completed her PhD at University of California Berkeley and began teaching and researching first at the Georgia Institute of Technology and then at Johns Hopkins University. She is the recipient of three Fulbright Awards and is one of four scientists, and the only woman, to have been awarded both of the Young Investigator Medals given within the Earth Sciences. She was a tenured professor at the University of Hawaii in Honolulu from 2008 to 2016, where she built the Isotope Geobiology Laboratories, with support from National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy and the National Institutes of Health. She currently holds the J. Tuzo Wilson professorship at the University of Oslo, Norway. Finally, Hope is the author of both the 2016 memoir Lab Girl, which was named one of the Best Books of the Year in The Washington Post, Time.com, NPR, Slate, Entertainment Weekly, Newsday, Minneapolis Star Tribute, and Kirkus Reviews, and this year’s book, The Story of More: How We Got to Climate Change and Where to Go from Here.”
Tuesday, August 18, 2020 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Online
The world will soon face warming of 1.5 degrees Celsius, perhaps as soon as 2024. Join us for a conversation about what a hotter planet will mean for people, ecosystems, and the international community. The Speakers: Ama R. Francis is the 2018-2020 Climate Law Fellow at Columbia University's Sabin Center for Climate Change Law. Her work focuses on developing legal solutions to disaster displacement and climate migration. She also analyzes and supports the implementation of adaptive measures in small islands and least developed countries. She graduated from Yale Law School in 2018 where she was an active member of Yale’s Environmental Justice Clinic, a student director of Immigration Legal Services, founder of Clarity & Community, and led New Directions in Environmental Law 2018. Ama also represented Dominica at COP22. Radley Horton is a Lamont Associate Research Professor at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. His research focuses on climate extremes, tail risks, climate impacts, and adaptation. Radley was a Convening Lead Author for the Third National Climate Assessment. He currently Co-Chairs Columbia’s Adaptation Initiative, and is Principal Investigator for the Columbia University-WWF ADVANCE partnership, and the NOAA-Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments-funded Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast. Radley is also the Columbia University lead for the Northeast Climate Science Center, and is a principal investigator on the Climate Change Education Partnership Project. Radley teaches in Columbia University’s Sustainable Development department.
Wednesday, August 19, 2020 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Online
This event is part 3 of a special 3-part series for educators on the Hudson River Estuary. Presenters: Margie Turrin, Director of Educational Field Programs, and Laurel Zaima, Education Program Assistant, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University Target Audience: Grades 9-12 educators Description: Migrating fish are monitored and managed across different regions and states. Data can appear to tell very different stories depending on when they are collected, over what time period, and what other supporting information is collected. In this session, you'll review the data and be the judge about the management decision to be made.
Thursday, August 20, 2020 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Online
The International Research Institute for Climate and Society (part of the Earth Institute) presents its monthly climate forecast briefing. The IRI's seasonal climate forecasts and ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) forecasts are discussed in this briefing by IRI's chief forecaster, Tony Barnston. In addition, the IRI climate group will present results of its experimental sub seasonal forecasts.
Thursday, September 17, 2020 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Online
The International Research Institute for Climate and Society (part of the Earth Institute) presents its monthly climate forecast briefing. The IRI's seasonal climate forecasts and ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) forecasts are discussed in this briefing by IRI's chief forecaster, Tony Barnston. In addition, the IRI climate group will present results of its experimental sub seasonal forecasts.
Thursday, September 17, 2020 3:00 PM - 4:15 PM
Online
Please join LDEO Interim Director Maureen Raymo for the final event in the Summer Stars Lecture Series, with Katharine Hayhoe. Talk titled: "Barriers to Public Acceptance of Climate Science, Impacts and Solutions.” Abstract: "The challenge posed by human-induced climate change to society and the natural environment has been carefully and methodically summarized by thousands of peer-reviewed studies and decades’ worth of exhaustive reports by Royal Societies, National Academies, federal agencies, and the IPCC. As the scientific evidence builds, however, public and political opinion in the U.S.—as well as in other developed nations including Australia, the U.K., and Canada—remains sharply divided along ideological, socio-economic, and religious lines. Understanding the reasons that have created and fed this polarization is crucial to the success of outreach efforts that attempt to bridge this divide. The main reason for this divergence is not a deficit of information or knowledge among the public. Instead, there are a plethora of causes that can be variously categorized as psychological, societal, political, and economic. The diversity of these barriers helps explain why no single message or campaign has been able to successfully turn the tide of public opinion. By identifying each of these barriers, however, I will share from my experience how it is possible to bypass much of the “he said-she said” stalemate in media and outreach activities, transitioning instead towards positive action based on a foundation of shared values and concerns." Bio: "Katharine Hayhoe is an atmospheric scientist whose research focuses on developing and applying high-resolution climate projections to understand what climate change means for people and the natural environment. She is the Political Science Endowed Professor in Public Policy and Public Law and co-directs the Climate Center at Texas Tech University and has a B.Sc. in Physics from the University of Toronto and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science from the University of Illinois. Katharine has served as a lead author for the Second, Third, and Fourth U.S. National Climate Assessments. She has also received the National Center for Science Education’s Friend of the Planet award, the American Geophysical Union’s Climate Communication Prize, the Sierra Club’s Distinguished Service award, and the Stephen H Schneider Climate Communication Award, and has been recognized as a United Nation Champion of the Earth in Science and Innovation."
Thursday, October 15, 2020 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Online
The International Research Institute for Climate and Society (part of the Earth Institute) presents its monthly climate forecast briefing. The IRI's seasonal climate forecasts and ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) forecasts are discussed in this briefing by IRI's chief forecaster, Tony Barnston. In addition, the IRI climate group will present results of its experimental sub seasonal forecasts.
Thursday, November 19, 2020 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Online
The International Research Institute for Climate and Society (part of the Earth Institute) presents its monthly climate forecast briefing. The IRI's seasonal climate forecasts and ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) forecasts are discussed in this briefing by IRI's chief forecaster, Tony Barnston. In addition, the IRI climate group will present results of its experimental sub seasonal forecasts.
Thursday, December 17, 2020 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Online
The International Research Institute for Climate and Society (part of the Earth Institute) presents its monthly climate forecast briefing. The IRI's seasonal climate forecasts and ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) forecasts are discussed in this briefing by IRI's chief forecaster, Tony Barnston. In addition, the IRI climate group will present results of its experimental sub seasonal forecasts.
Thursday, January 21, 2021 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Online
The International Research Institute for Climate and Society (part of the Earth Institute) presents its monthly climate forecast briefing. The IRI's seasonal climate forecasts and ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) forecasts are discussed in this briefing by IRI's chief forecaster, Tony Barnston. In addition, the IRI climate group will present results of its experimental sub seasonal forecasts.
Thursday, February 18, 2021 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Online
The International Research Institute for Climate and Society (part of the Earth Institute) presents its monthly climate forecast briefing. The IRI's seasonal climate forecasts and ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) forecasts are discussed in this briefing by IRI's chief forecaster, Tony Barnston. In addition, the IRI climate group will present results of its experimental sub seasonal forecasts.
Thursday, March 18, 2021 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Online
The International Research Institute for Climate and Society (part of the Earth Institute) presents its monthly climate forecast briefing. The IRI's seasonal climate forecasts and ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) forecasts are discussed in this briefing by IRI's chief forecaster, Tony Barnston. In addition, the IRI climate group will present results of its experimental sub seasonal forecasts.