Featured News

American Scholar
Tuesday, August 13, 2019

“These trees are all singing their own song,” says paleoclimatologist Nicole Davi, a professor at William Patterson University and an adjunct research scientist at Columbia’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. She has studied tree rings from Mongolia to Montauk and says that with this project, “it’s difficult to know what’s going on,” with growth rings varying from tree to tree.

New York Times
Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Features Lamont scientist Steven Chillrud. 

Ecomagazine
Monday, August 12, 2019

Cites Lamont research.

National Geographic
Monday, August 12, 2019

Article about study coauthored by Lamont scientist Pierre Dutrieux. 

Inside Climate News
Monday, August 12, 2019

Article about study coauthored by Lamont scientist Pierre Dutrieux.

Vice News
Monday, August 12, 2019

Story quotes Lamont scientist Bob Newton.

CBC News
Monday, August 12, 2019

Article quotes Lamont scientist Marco Tedesco.

Grist
Saturday, August 10, 2019

Article quotes Lamont scientist Marco Tedesco.

Rockland Journal News
Friday, August 9, 2019

Study of NY state air pollution by Xiaomeng Jin, Arlene Fiore

Labroots
Thursday, August 8, 2019

Article on research by Lamont scientists Xiaomeng Jin and Arlene Fiore.

Eos
Thursday, August 8, 2019

Article on research by Lamont grad student Kira Olsen.

 

Voice of America
Thursday, August 8, 2019

Quotes Lamont scientist Marco Tedesco.

 

U.S. News & World Report
Thursday, August 8, 2019

Study of NY state air pollution by Xiaomeng Jin, Arlene Fiore

Guardian
Wednesday, August 7, 2019

“We are seeing record after record after record,” said Marco Tedesco, a climate scientist at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, of the heat and melting episodes. “It looks like the worst case scenario put forward by the IPCC [International Panel on Climate Change] could be an underestimate because we are seeing ice melting now that we expected 30 to 40 years from now. It’s alarming because it’s very fast-paced and the consequences are hard to predict.”

NBC News
Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Interview with Lamont scientist Radley Horton.

The Washington Post
Monday, August 5, 2019

“A heat wave today is going to have a much more potent influence on flammability than one 150 years ago when temperatures were 3.5 degrees cooler,” said Park Williams, a climate scientist at Columbia University. In a new study released in July, Williams and his co-authors found a heat signature in the dramatic increase (405 percent) in California’s burned area since 1972, one that appears as a rise in big summer forest fires in the Sierra and the forested northern coast regions — like 2018’s Ferguson Fire in Yosemite and the record Mendocino Complex Fire.

Smithsonian
Monday, August 5, 2019
This year alone, Marco Tedesco of Columbia University’s Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory says, the ice sheet has lost an estimated 248 billion tons—roughly on par with the 250 billion tons of melt recorded by the end of July 2012.
ABC News
Friday, August 2, 2019

Scientists are noticing that these kinds of heat waves are becoming "more and more frequent," Marco Tedesco, a polar scientist specializing in Greenland for the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University in New York, told ABC News in June. At the time, another pocket of air led to clear skies and therefore more solar radiation, baking the eastern part of Greenland and melting 2 billion tons of the ice sheet.

USA Today
Friday, August 2, 2019

Columbia University professor of geophysics Marco Tedesco said that the sea-level rise and increased ocean acidity and warmth, combined with increased storm surges and rainfall caused by the melting of glaciers creates a "perfect recipe for an economic and social disruption along our coastlines." "They have a huge devastating power on our lives, on our economy, on the property of our houses and on our infrastructure," he said to USA TODAY. "And this [devastation] is all adding up."

Vice
Friday, August 2, 2019

The area affected by the melt this year is as big as any since 2012, when more than 90% of the ice area was affected. Right now about 57% is affected. “We’re basically on pace. We’re in the ballpark of the 2012 record,” Marco Tedesco, a polar scientist at Columbia University’s Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, told National Geographic.

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