Featured News

Reuters
Friday, June 10, 2016

The globalization of the world's economy this century has made it far more vulnerable to the impacts of extreme weather, including heat stress on workers, according to a new study from Lamont's Anders Levermann.

CBC
Friday, June 10, 2016

2015 was a record year for high temperatures and melting glaciers in western Greenland, an effect that is amplifying itself and could lead to accelerated warming in the Arctic, new research from Lamont's Marco Tedesco explains.

Science
Thursday, June 9, 2016

Researchers working in Iceland, including Lamont's Martin Stute, say they have discovered a new way to trap the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide deep underground by changing it into rock.

The Conversation
Thursday, June 9, 2016

Lamont's Martin Stute writes about the CarbFix project in Iceland, where he has been working with other scientists and engineers to capture CO2 emissions and create permanent storage by turning CO2 to stone.

New York Times
Thursday, June 9, 2016

Lamont scientists have come up with a way to store carbon dioxide that dissolves the gas with water and pumps the resulting mixture — soda water, essentially — down into certain kinds of rocks, where the CO2 reacts with the rock to form a mineral called calcite. By turning the gas into stone, scientists can lock it away permanently.

Washington Post
Thursday, June 9, 2016

Reanalyzing Greenland's last melt season, Lamont's Marco Tedesco found something odd and worrying. Greenland had shown much more unusual melting in its colder northern stretches than in the warmer south, and that this had occurred because of very strange behavior in the atmosphere above it.

Science
Thursday, June 9, 2016

A new analysis of the Greenland Ice Sheet led by Lamont's Marco Tedesco points to an underappreciated culprit that could accelerate the melting of the Greenland ice sheet: wind.

Smithsonian Magazine
Thursday, June 9, 2016

A pilot in Iceland project that sought to demonstrate that carbon dioxide emissions could be locked up by turning them into rock appears to be a success. Smithsonian Magazine talked with Lamont's Juerg Matter, who has been involved in the project, and Dave Goldberg.

Washington Post
Thursday, June 9, 2016

New research from Lamont's Adam Sobel and alumnus Solomon Hsiang suggests that even a moderate amount of warming could force populations in the tropics to undergo huge migrations — longer journeys than they would have to take if they lived anywhere else on the planet.

UPI
Thursday, June 9, 2016

New research led by Lamont's Marco Tedesco links Greenland's 2015 record temperatures and melting with the phenomenon known as Arctic amplification.

USA Today
Thursday, June 9, 2016

As Arctic sea ice hit a record low, scientists led by Lamont's Marco Tedesco announced the first link between melting ice in Greenland and a phenomenon known as Arctic amplification, the faster warming of the Arctic compared to the rest of the Northern Hemisphere.

The Economist
Tuesday, June 7, 2016

The pioneering maps put together by Lamont's Marie Tharp and Bruce Heezen in the 1950s and 1960s, which first identified the structure of the mid-Atlantic ridge, were mind-expandingly right in their synoptic vision. The Economist looks at the challenges then and now of mapping the sea floor.

New York Times
Monday, June 6, 2016

Lamont's Joerg Schaefer answers a reader's science question for the New York Times: Was there an ice age in the Southern Hemisphere?

Science Explorer
Thursday, June 2, 2016

A team of Lamont researchers led by Christine McCarthy has built a new apparatus in the Rock Mechanics Lab to gain insight into the behavior of ice on Earth and elsewhere in the solar system.

Earth Magazine
Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Earth Magazine talks with Suzanne Carbotte and other scientists about advances in the mapping of the seafloor that are providing extraordinary detail.

E&E
Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Scientists led by Lamont's Beizhan Yan have discovered the mechanism that transported contaminants from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill to the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico.

Der Spiegel
Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Researchers led by Lamont's Beizhan Yan estimate that 10 to 15 percent of the oil released by the Deepwater Horizon disaster sank to the seabed in the Gulf of Mexico, where it covered hundreds of square miles. (In German)

American Institute of Physics
Tuesday, May 31, 2016

A new study led by Lamont's Christine McCarthy offers a glimpse of what happens inside ice. The scientists developed a device to measure ice as it changes in response to external forces, both on Earth and on the moons of other planets.

Climate Connections
Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Was that extreme weather event caused by climate change? It’s a question scientists get asked a lot, and one that they’re increasingly able to answer, says Lamont's Adam Sobel.

NPR
Monday, May 23, 2016

The wreckage from EgyptAir Flight 804 is likely in the Mediterranean Sea somewhere between Crete and Egypt. Lamont's David Gallo discusses the challenges of the search.

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