News and Events

  • July 30, 2019

    Silting rivers and bad roads made it difficult to find a last site. After a successful installation and an upgrade to an existing GPS site, we left the boat for land. We then discovered the local river had washed away some of our equipment.

  • July 26, 2019

    As part of the MPA in Environmental Science and Policy, students undertake science courses that will serve as a foundational basis for tackling policy issues. Who better to learn from than the individuals who dominate earth science research?

  • July 26, 2019

    We sailed to Hiron Point in the Sundarban Mangrove Forest to upgrade old and install new equipment. I have been to this beautiful remote site several times before. After competing the work, we sailed for over a day to reach our next site on a primary school roof.

  • July 26, 2019

    By Elizabeth Case and Jonny Kingslake

  • July 24, 2019

    By working a 16-hour day, we managed to get both GPS and SETs completed at our first field site. We then sailed into the Sundarban Mangrove Forest, the world’s largest, to visit an existing site and make measurements.

  • July 24, 2019

    Climate scientists often invoke the Medieval Warm Period and the Little Ice Age as natural worldwide climate swings predating human influences. They may not have worked the way we think.

  • July 24, 2019

    Study picks apart factors that caused severe, long-lasting droughts and suggests increased risk for future.

  • July 23, 2019

    I am back in Bangladesh for a new project examining the balance between sea level rise, land subsidence and sedimentation. We will be installing, repairing or upgrading equipment to measure changes to the landscape.

  • July 22, 2019

    A new study reveals how local factors influence the Ross Ice Shelf’s stability, refining predictions of how it will change and influence sea rise in the future.

  • July 22, 2019

    Millions of years ago, vegetation across much of the world underwent a transformation as grasses with a new way of doing photosynthesis displaced previously dominant plants, shrubs and trees. A new study examines what got these plants started, and why they spread so far and wide.

  • July 19, 2019

    Recovering ancient seafloor sediments requires complicated machinery and a skilled crew.

  • July 18, 2019

    The Apollo missions brought back unique samples from the moon that have been analyzed by researchers around the world. This data is getting lost and forgotten. A new database collects it and makes it easy to find and use.

  • July 17, 2019

    Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory director Sean Solomon discusses how Apollo 11 affected the scientific community, how Lamont was involved, and what comes next for lunar exploration.

  • July 17, 2019

    Hundreds of experts gathered on campus to discuss possibilities for protecting coastal communities and withdrawing when we can no longer safely inhabit our coastlines.

  • July 16, 2019

    Climate change could worsen China’s already bad ozone pollution problem — but a new study shows that it doesn’t have to be that way.

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