News and Events

  • March 31, 2009

    Iran seems to be moving toward an atomic bomb; North Korea reportedly could build a half dozen; and terrorist attacks have revived the specter of a faceoff between nuclear-armed Pakistan and India. Yet the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, forbidding  nuclear testing, has failed to win ratification from the U.S. Senate and lawmakers of some other nations. Opponents say scientists cannot reliably detect clandestine tests: Why should we go along, if others can cheat?

  • March 31, 2009

    In 1968, 14-year-old Paul Olsen of suburban Livingston, N.J., and his friend Tony Lessa heard that dinosaur tracks had been found in a nearby quarry. They raced over on their bikes.  "I went ballistic," Olsen recalls. Over the next few years, the boys uncovered and studied thousands of tracks and other fossils there, often working into the night.  It opened the world of science to Olsen; he went on to become one of the nation’s leading paleontologists.

  • March 13, 2009

    Warming Climate Drives Plankton and Penguins Poleward   

    Adélie penguins are flocking closer to the South Pole. A new study in the leading journal Science explains why: they’re following the food supply, which is moving southward with changing climate.

  • March 13, 2009

    Releases May Have Speeded End of Last Ice Age—And Could Act Again 

    Natural releases of carbon dioxide from the Southern Ocean due to shifting wind patterns could have amplified global warming...

  • March 05, 2009

    6,000 Square Miles in U.S. Might Turn Emissions to Harmless Solids

    To slow global warming, scientists are exploring ways to pull carbon dioxide from the air and safely lock it away.

  • February 12, 2009

    JOIDES Resolution to Range from Bering Sea to Antarctic

    After a major overhaul, one of the world’s two major scientific deep-sea drilling ships is back at sea.  Much of the coming year’s research aboard the JOIDES Resolution will focus on sudden climate shifts...

  • January 22, 2009

    Aboard R/V  Gould, off Antarctica--Scientists aboard the U.S. research vessel Laurence M Gould, 10,000 miles from Washington off Antarctica, held their own presidential inaugural celebration on Jan. 20.

  • January 16, 2009

    Climate Scientist Who Sounded Early Warnings Is Still At Work

    Wallace S. Broecker, a geochemist at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, has received the newly founded Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Climate Change Research, one of the world’s largest science prizes. An international jury awarded Broecker the $527,000 prize, from Spain’s Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria Foundation, for sounding early alarms about climate change, and for his pioneering work on how the oceans and atmosphere interact.

  • January 08, 2009

    J. Lamar Worzel, a pioneering geophysicist and engineer who helped shape human understanding of how sound travels through the oceans and who cofounded Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, died Dec. 26. He was 89.

  • January 06, 2009

    But Global Warming May Have Helped Override Some Recent Eruptions

    Climate researchers have shown that big volcanic eruptions over the past 450 years have temporarily cooled weather in the tropics—but suggest that such effects may have been masked in the 20th century by rising global temperatures

  • December 19, 2008

    Rising Seas, Severe Drought, Could Come in Decades, Says U.S. Report   The United States could suffer the effects of abrupt climate changes within decades—sooner than some previously thought--says a new government report.

  • December 12, 2008

    Lamont-Doherty scientists are presenting scores of talks at the world’s largest gathering of earth scientists, the fall 2008 meeting of the American Geophysical Union. Subjects include unseen natural hazards, changing climate, the fall of ancient civilizations, and how future mankind might turn atmospheric carbon to stone.

  • November 20, 2008

    Maya Tolstoy Recognized for Deep-Sea Exploration

    Maya Tolstoy, a marine geophysicist at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, has received the 2009 Women of Discovery Sea Award for her pioneering work in studying the ocean floors.

  • November 11, 2008

    Geophysicist Robin Bell and climate modeler Richard Seager have been appointed Palisades Geophysical Institute senior scientists at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. PGI positions are awarded to Lamont scientists in recognition of outstanding research contributions to their fields, and leadership within national and international arenas as well as within the institution.

  • November 05, 2008

    Proposed Method Would Speed Natural Reactions a Million Times

    Scientists say that a type of rock found at or near the surface in the Mideast nation of Oman and other areas around the world could be harnessed to soak up huge quantities of globe-warming carbon dioxide.

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