News and Events

  • February 23, 2011

    We may think of the Pacific Northwest as rain-drenched, but new research led by scientists at the University of Pittsburgh shows that the region could be in for longer dry seasons, and is unlikely to see a period as wet as the 20th century any time soon.

  • February 22, 2011

    Scientists using underwater sensors to explore Lake Rotomahana in New Zealand have uncovered remnants of the Pink Terraces,” once considered the eighth natural wonder of the world.

  • February 18, 2011

    Northern New Jersey, southern Connecticut and environs are not necessarily where one would expect to explore the onetime extinction of much life on earth, and subsequent rise of dinosaurs. But it turns out to be a pretty good place to start. Underlying the exurbs are geological formations left by three giant episodes of volcanism starting around 200 million years ago, and intervening layers of sediments that built up in the interims between massive lava flows.

  • February 09, 2011
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    Researchers from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and the Earth Institute work on every continent and every ocean; journalists are welcome to cover projects in the field or otherwise contact scientists.  Below: selected expeditions worldwide, in rough chronological order. (New York/Hudson Valley is listed separately.)  Journalists or employers must pay travel expenses. Photos, blogs and phone/email from field sites will be available in many cases.  Blogs are accessible from the Lamont-Doherty home page and the Earth Institute’s State of the Planet pages. An updated version of this list is kept on our Media Advisory page. Unless otherwise stated, projects originate with our Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.

  • February 01, 2011

    Columbia University is joining a growing movement among universities and research institutions to make scholarly research available free to the public online. Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory is the first program at the university to adopt an open access resolution, which calls for faculty and other researchers to post their scientific papers in online repositories such as Columbia’s Academic Commons.

  • January 31, 2011

    Columbia scientists have played a pioneering role in understanding climate change, from its potential effect on critical resources such as water and energy to finding ways vulnerable communities can better adapt.

    Columbia University's the Record devotes its January 31, 2011 issue to climate matters, and Lamont-Doherty researchers feature prominently. 

  • January 21, 2011
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    Lamont-Doherty scientists Wallace S. Broecker and Peter Schlosser have been elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and they will be recognized for their contributions to science Feb. 19 at the annual meeting of AAAS in Washington, D.C.

  • January 20, 2011

    Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory director G. Michael Purdy has been named Columbia University’s executive vice president for research. Taking over as interim director of the observatory is associate director Arthur Lerner-Lam.  The moves, effective Feb. 1, were announced by Columbia president Lee Bollinger and Earth Institute director Jeffrey Sachs in emails to staff  Jan. 19.

  • January 10, 2011

    A mobile application released this week provides users with simplified access to vast libraries of images and information that up until now were tapped mainly by earth and environmental scientists.

  • January 05, 2011

    Dr. John Ertle “Jack” Oliver, a geophysicist whose research helped revolutionize our understanding of the basic forces shaping the planet, died peacefully at his home in Ithaca, N.Y., on Wednesday, Jan. 5, 2011. He was 87.

  • December 22, 2010

    In the first project of its kind, scientists are drilling deep into the bed of the fast-shrinking Dead Sea, searching for clues to past climate changes and other events that may have affected human history back through Biblical times and before.

  • December 08, 2010
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    The Dec. 13-17 meeting of the American Geophysical Union, the world’s largest gathering of earth scientists, includes many important talks from scientists at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Below: a small selection that has been flagged to the many reporters attending the meeting.

  • November 24, 2010

    Charts, graphs and maps representing natural phenomena can be a challenge to anyone trying to extract something meaningful from them. A new book, Earth Science Puzzles: Making Meaning From Data, aims to help students of earth and environmental sciences decode images by presenting practice puzzles consisting of real-world scientific data.

  • November 03, 2010

    Scientists have long known that large volcanic explosions can affect the weather by spewing particles that block solar energy and cool the air. Some suspect that extended “volcanic winters” from gigantic blowups helped kill off dinosaurs and Neanderthals...

  • October 27, 2010

    Each year, dozens of small, mostly harmless earthquakes quakes rattle the northeastern United States and southern Canada, and one quite active area runs along the shores of lakes Erie and Ontario, in western New York. In order to learn more about what generates these, and the possible threat of something bigger, scientists at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory have installed a new seismometer at the West Valley Central School, southeast of Buffalo.

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