Sea-ice extent in the Southern Ocean during the Last Glacial Maximum: another approach to the problem

Publication Status is "Submitted" Or "In Press: 
LDEO Publication: 
Publication Type: 
Year of Publication: 
1998
Editor: 
Journal Title: 
Annals of Glaciology, Vol 27, 1998
Journal Date: 
Place Published: 
Tertiary Title: 
Volume: 
27
Issue: 
Pages: 
302-304
Section / Start page: 
Publisher: 
ISBN Number: 
0260-3055
ISSN Number: 
Edition: 
Short Title: 
Accession Number: 
ISI:000079713100049
LDEO Publication Number: 
Call Number: 
Key Words: 
Abstract: 

Determining past sea-ice distribution is an important goal of paleoceanographers. Here, we present a possible approach to deter-mining past sea-ice distribution in the Southern Ocean during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Diatoms are the principal opal-forming organisms south of the Antarctic Polar Front; their productivity is partly mediated by the presence/absence of sea ice. We reasoned that there should be good coherence between percentage biogenic opal in surface sediments and percentage annual sea-ice cover. This hypothesis was tested by comparing percentage biogenic opal in surface sediments against modern-day sea-ice cover in surface waters directly above each core site. The chronology for each core was determined by various means (biostratigraphy, C-14 age dating, and carbonate and opal stratigraphy). With the resulting curve we estimate that yearly concentration of sea ice can be determined to within 30%. Using these data, we estimated percentage sea-ice cover during the LGM for a number of sediment sites (50-66 degrees S) from the Southern Ocean. Core sites now beneath 100% open water witnessed some 25-60% sea ice during the LGM while core sites presently beneath sea ice during half of the year witnessed more than 75% sea-ice cover during the LGM.

Notes: 

Bm76jTimes Cited:3Cited References Count:15Annals of Glaciology

DOI: