LDEO Research Blogs

  • Driven by processes in the deep earth over millions of years, the East African Rift is slowly tearing the continent apart, producing earthquakes and volcanoes along its 2,400-mile track. A scientific team including Donna Shillington, James Gaherty and Cornelia Class of Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory is working in Malawi and Tanzania to understand the causes, the long-term evolution, and the real-time hazards.

  • Over the past six decades, researchers have been perfecting the art and science of measuring the chemistry of ocean sediments to learn how ocean temperatures, ocean circulation, and marine biological productivity have evolved. The purpose of this research is ultimately to understand more about today’s climate system and to test numerical models of the future Earth system. In this blog, climate scientist Kelsey Dyez of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory will explore research and recent findings, and also share stories of how scientists go about their jobs and come to such understandings.

  • Greenland’s ice sheets are shrinking faster than ever, responsible for about a quarter of sea-level rise globally. Alison Glacier on Greenland’s northwestern coast is one place where ice flow to the sea has speeded up. From a tiny hunting and fishing village in the Upernavik Islands, scientists from Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory will take ocean measurements to understand why Alison is surging to the sea faster than nearby glaciers. They will also work with villagers to continue data collection when they’re gone.

  • Scientists from a number of research institutions are participating in an expedition aboard the R/V L’Atalante to study how microorganisms in the South Pacific Ocean influence the carbon cycle. Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory graduate student Kyle Frischkorn is among them; his goal is to assess how the microorganism Trichodesmium and other microbes interact, and the resulting physiological and biogeochemical impacts these processes have on marine ecosystems.

  • The Dec. 13-17 meeting of the American Geophysical Union, in San Francisco, is the world's largest gathering of earth and space scientists. Scores of researchers from the Earth Institute will give presentations. Read about it here.p>

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