Featured News

Alaska Dispatch
Saturday, April 9, 2016

A landslide last October detected in Alaska by Lamont's Colin Stark and Göran Ekström might be the biggest non-volcanic landslide recorded in North American history. It also created a wave that sheared alders more than 500 feet up the opposite hillside.

Grind TV
Friday, April 8, 2016

The World Surf League just launched a non-profit, WSL PURE. It will help researchers at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory study climate change and the ocean.

Surfing Life
Wednesday, April 6, 2016

The World Surf League has just launched a whole new wing of their organisation, WSL PURE. This time, it's all about giving back. The new philanthropic wing is putting $1.5 million in first-year funding into ocean science at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.

Washington Post
Tuesday, April 5, 2016

“More melting creates more darkening and accelerates the melting itself — a positive feedback effect,” Lamont's Marco Tedesco said.

CU's New York Stories
Monday, April 4, 2016

“You won’t open your mouth in the Hudson River, and that’s symbolic of a lot of things,” says Wade McGillis, an associate research professor at Lamont. “We want to figure out if we can restore it to a pristine system. If you don’t know what you’re doing to it, you can’t figure out ways to fix it. ”

New York Times
Saturday, April 2, 2016

Lamont's Adam Sobel reminds readers to differentiate between weather and climate. If you really want to know what is going on with climate change, he said, look at the long-term averages over large areas. Do not be fooled by short-term weather fluctuations.

Washington Post
Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Lamont's Robin Bell talks about the urgent need for Antarctic research. A recent study found that, with very high carbon emissions, melting ice from Antarctica could cause seas to rise 1.14 meters (3.74 feet), give or take 36 centimeters, by 2100 — and much more by 2500.

The New Yorker
Monday, March 28, 2016

The New Yorker talks to a team of scientists, including Lamont Associate Research Professor Mike Kaplan and Adjunct Associate Research Scientist Aaron Putnam, who are researching how quickly the ice in the Himalayas is melting.

Fox News
Thursday, March 24, 2016

The devastation caused by earthquakes is evident all across the world, but could something like this happen in our area? Fox news talks with Jim Gaherty.

Geographical
Wednesday, March 23, 2016

When plants respire, they contribute a massive carbon flux to the atmosphere so their response to higher temperatures is a major concern for scientists. A new study from Lamont's Kevin Griffin finds plants might not respond to warming as thought.

Guardian
Monday, March 21, 2016

Higher temperatures in France are producing exceptional vintages, but the run will come to an end if global warming continues at the current rate, a new study from Lamont's Ben Cook suggests.

AFP
Monday, March 21, 2016

Climate change has pushed French wines into uncharted territory, and could force producers to relocate or abandon the grapes that helped to make their vineyards famous, according to a study from Lamont's Ben Cook.

The Conversation
Monday, March 21, 2016

"Our analysis showed that wine harvests are happening earlier, which has historically been a harbinger of high-quality wines. But we also found that changing local weather conditions could make it harder to determine when to expect high-quality wines, and that higher temperatures could force wine growers to use different grape varieties," writes Lamont's Ben Cook.

Christian Science Monitor
Monday, March 21, 2016

Carbon emissions hit a dramatic high nearly 10 million years after the demise of the dinosaurs some 66 million years ago. But emissions now far surpass that. "What we're doing today is much more extreme than what happened in Earth's history," says Lamont's Bärbel Hönisch.

Public News Service
Monday, March 21, 2016

A crew of scientists led by Lamont's Park Williams has been making its way through the Ozark Mountains, dodging snakes and poison ivy to study tree rings, to see how they're reacting to climate change.

Christian Science Monitor
Saturday, March 19, 2016

"When it comes down to climate and carbon sequestration, these are global problems," says Lamont's Kevin Griffin.

The Tribune
Saturday, March 19, 2016

Worried about how climate change will affect rainfall in the coming decades, some San Luis Obispo residents are calling on the city to stop allowing developers to build new homes — at least until the city recalculates its future water supply.

JNS
Friday, March 18, 2016

A combination of water from rainfall, recycling of wastewater, desalination of seawater, and a large-scare water conservation campaign helped Israel get through what research from Lamont's Ben Cook shows is the region's worst drought in more than 900 years.

CNN
Thursday, March 17, 2016

Scientists are increasingly able to attribute aspects of extreme weather to the overall change in the climate, as John Sutter discusses with Lamont's Park Williams.

Science
Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Compared with trees suddenly exposed to hot temperatures, acclimated trees may release far less CO2 at night, a new study suggests. Science talks with Lamont's Kevin Griffin.

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